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Jamaican Food Glossary:

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saccharin This is an Jamaican artificial sweetener which is much sweeter than regular sugar. T
saffron This is the yellow-orange stigmas from a small purple crocus. The aromatic Jamaican spice is used to flavor and tint Jamaican food. T
sage This Jamaican herb is used for culinary and medicinal uses. Jamaican sage is commonly used in dishes containing Jamaican pork, cheese and beans, and in poultry and stuffing's. T
sake This Japanese wine, the national alcoholic drink of Japan, is traditionally served warm in small porcelain cups. T
salad bowl lettuce Any of several varieties of lettuce with leaves that branch from a single stalk in a loose bunch rather than forming a tight head. The leaves are crisper and more full-flavored than those of the head lettuce varieties. The Jamaican lettuce is a commonly used vegetable in the preparation of Jamaican food recipes. T
salad dressing A thick, creamy Jamaican dressing that's an emulsion of vegetable oil, egg yolks, lemon juice or vinegar and seasonings. Jamaican mayonnaise is widely used as a spread, a dressing and a Jamaican sauce. It's also used as the base for a plethora of other mixtures including Jamaican tartar sauce recipe. T
salad spinner A kitchen utensil that uses centrifugal force to dry freshly washed Jamaican salad greens and herbs. Wet ingredients are placed in an inner basket. The basket is set into an outer container fitted with a lid with a gear-operated handle or pull-cord. As the handle is turned (or cord pulled), the perforated inner container spins rapidly, forcing moisture off the Jamaican food out through the perforations and into the outer container. T
salami These are sausages that have been preserved by curing. Jamaican salamis, however, tend to be more boldly seasoned particularly with Jamaican garlic. Jamaican salamis are usually air-dried and vary in size, shape, seasoning and curing process. Jamaican salamis are made from a mixture of Jamaican beef and Jamaican pork. Jamaican salami is eaten as a snack or chopped and used in dishes such as Jamaican soup recipes and Jamaican salad recipes. T
salmagundi A Jamaican salad including greens, chopped cooked Jamaican meats and Jamaican vegetables. The ingredients are artfully arranged on a platter and drizzled with dressing. It is also a general term for a Jamaican stew or other multi-ingredient dish. T
salsify This root Jamaican vegetable is also known as oyster plant  because its taste resembles a delicately flavored oyster. The Jamaican parsnip-shaped salsify can reach up to 12 inches in length and 2 1/2 inches in diameter. The most commonly found Jamaican salsify has a white-fleshed root with grayish skin, though there are varieties with a pale golden skin. Jamaican salsify is generally eaten plain as a vegetable, or used in savory pies and Jamaican soup recipes. T
salt Jamaican salt is mined and comes from large deposits left by dried salt lakes. Jamaican salt is mainly used in cooking and as a table condiment. Iodized salt is table salt with added iodine. Jamaican salt substitutes, frequently used by those on low-salt diets, are products containing little or no sodium. T
salt cod This popular salt fish has mild-flavored meat is white, lean and firm. Jamaican salt fish can be baked, poached, braised, broiled and fried. This is used in one of Jamaica's most popular recipes Jamaican ackee and salt fish recipes. T
salt pork Jamaican salt pork is salt-cured, this is a layer of fat that is cut from the pig's belly and sides. Jamaican salt pork is similar to bacon but much fattier and unsmoked. Jamaican salt pork is used primarily as a flavoring and is an important ingredient in many Jamaican dishes. T
salt fish Jamaican salt fish is salted, dried fish, usually cod, Jamaican salt fish is an integral ingredient in Jamaica's national dish, salt fish and ackee. T
salt-rising bread This is a fermented mixture of warm milk or water, flour, cornmeal, sugar and salt to give it rising power. Jamaican salt-rising bread has a very smooth texture with a tangy flavor and aroma. T
salty black beans Jamaican salty black beans consists of small black soybeans that have been preserved in salt before being packed into cans or plastic bags. Jamaican salty black beans have an extremely pungent, salty flavor and must be soaked in warm water for about 30 minutes before using.  T
sardine Jamaican sardines are a small, soft-boned, saltwater fish such as sprat or herring. Jamaican sardines are usually found in tins. T
sarsaparilla Jamaican sarsaparilla is derived from the dried roots of tropical smilax vines, this Jamaican herb is popular for medicinal and other uses including flavoring Jamaican foods and teas. T
sassafras The leaves of the Jamaican sassafras tree are dried and used to make sassafras powder and sassafras tea. The Jamaican root bark is used as a flavoring agent in root beer.. T
saté; satay This consists of small marinated cubes of Jamaican meat, Jamaican fish or poultry threaded on skewers and grilled or broiled. Jamaican saté is usually served with a spicy peanut sauce. It's a favorite snack Jamaican food but is also often served for a Jamaican appetizer. T
saturated fat Jamaican saturated fats come from animal sources and tropical oils such as Jamaican coconut oil. Jamaican saturated fats are butter or lard and hydrogenated vegetable oils such as Jamaican margarine and Jamaican vegetable shortening. T
sauce To cover or mix a Jamaican food with a sauce. Jamaican sauce is a thickened, flavored liquid designed to accompany food in order to enhance and bring out its flavor. Jamaican sauce recipes are very popular. T
saucepan A round cooking utensil with a relatively long handle and (usually) a tight-fitting cover. The sides can be straight or flared and deep or as shallow as 3 inches. Depending on the style, the versatile saucepan has a multitude of uses including making Jamaican soup recipes and Jamaican sauce recipes, boiling vegetables and other Jamaican foods, braising and even sautéing.  T
sauerkraut Jamaican sauerkraut is made by combining shredded cabbage, salt and sometimes Jamaican spices, and allowing the mixture to ferment. Jamaican sauerkraut is used in casseroles, as a side dish and even on Jamaican sandwich recipes. Jamaican sauerkraut is an excellent source of vitamin C as well as of some of the B vitamins. T
sausage Jamaican sausage is ground Jamaican meat mixed with fat, salt and other Jamaican seasonings, preservatives and sometimes fillers. Such a mixture is usually packed into a casing. Jamaican sausages can be fully cooked, partially cooked and uncooked, which may or may not require cooking depending on how or whether it's been cured.  T
sauté pan A wide pan with straight or slightly curved sides that are generally a little higher than those of a frying pan. It has a long handle on one side; heavy sauté pans usually have a loop handle on the other side so the pan can be easily lifted. Sauté pans are most often made of stainless steel, enameled cast iron, aluminum, anodized aluminum or copper. As the name suggests, a sauté pan efficiently browns and cooks Jamaican meats and a variety of other Jamaican foods T
sauté; sautéed; sautéing To cook Jamaican food quickly in a small amount of oil in a skillet or sauté pan over direct heat. T
savarin This is a rich Jamaican yeast cake is soaked with Jamaican rum-flavored syrup and filled with Jamaican pastry cream or fresh Jamaican fruit. T
savory A Jamaican herb closely related to the mint family. Jamaican savory has an aroma and flavor reminiscent of a cross between Jamaican thyme and mint. Jamaican savory adds a piquant flavor to many Jamaican foods including Jamaican soup recipes, Jamaican meat, Jamaican fish and bean dishes. T
savory A Jamaican herb closely related to the mint family. Jamaican savory has an aroma and flavor reminiscent of a cross between Jamaican thyme and mint. Jamaican savory adds a piquant flavor to many Jamaican foods including Jamaican soup recipes, Jamaican meat, Jamaican fish and bean dishes. T
scald A dry, tan- or brown-colored area on the skin of a Jamaican fruit, such as a Jamaican apple. This is also a Jamaican cooking technique often used to retard the souring of milk whereby a liquid is heated to just below the boiling point. It is also to plunge Jamaican food such as tomatoes into boiling water in order to loosen their skin and facilitate peeling. T
scale A Jamaican cooking technique by which the scales are removed from the skin of a fish, generally using a dull knife or a special kitchen tool called a fish scalar. T
scale, kitchen A kitchen device used to accurately record the weight of ingredients. Kitchen scales are particularly important for consistent baking results and for weighing Jamaican meats in order to estimate cooking time. T
scallion Jamaican scallion or escallion is immature onions young leeks and sometimes the tops of young shallots. The Jamaican vegetable has a white base that has not fully developed into a bulb and green leaves that are long and straight. Jamaican scallions can be cooked whole as a Jamaican vegetable much as you would a leek. They can also be chopped and used in Jamaican salad recipes, Jamaican soup recipes and a multitude of other dishes for flavor. T
scallop This is a bivalve mollusk has two fan-shaped shells with an adductor muscle that hinges the two shells. Jamaican scallops can be prepared by sautéing, grilling, broiling and poaching. They're also used in Jamaican soup recipes, stews and Jamaican salad recipes. To prepare a Jamaican food by layering slices of it with cream or a creamy sauce in a casserole. T
scaloppini A thin scallop of Jamaican meat (most often veal), usually prepared by dredging the meat in flour before sautéing it. Jamaican scaloppini dishes are generally served with a Jamaican sauce based on wine or tomatoes. T
scampi The term is often used to describe large Jamaican shrimp that are split, brushed with Jamaican garlic oil or butter and broiled. T
score To make shallow cuts in the surface of certain Jamaican foods, such as Jamaican meat or fish. This is done for several reasons: as a decoration on some Jamaican foods; as a means of assisting flavor absorption to tenderize less tender cuts of Jamaican meat; and to allow excess fat to drain during cooking. T
Scotch bonnet chile This small, irregularly shaped chile ranges in color from yellow to orange to red. The Jamaican scotch bonnet is one of the hottest of the chiles and is closely related to the equally fiery to any other hot peppers. T
scrapple This Jamaican dish is derived from the finely chopped "scraps" of cooked Jamaican pork that are mixed with fine-ground cornmeal, pork broth and seasonings before being cooked into a mush. The Jamaican dish is packed into loaf pans and cooled. Slices of the scrapple are then cut from the loaves, fried in butter and served hot, usually for Jamaican breakfast or Jamaican brunch. T
screwdriver A Jamaican mixed drink recipe of Jamaican orange juice and vodka served over ice. T
scrod This popular salt fish has mild-flavored meat is white, lean and firm. Jamaican salt fish can be baked, poached, braised, broiled and fried. This is used in one of Jamaica's most popular recipes Jamaican ackee and salt fish recipes. T
seafood Any edible Jamaican fish or shellfish that comes from the sea. There are over 600 Jamaican fish and shellfish recipes. T
sear To brown Jamaican meat quickly by subjecting it to very high heat either in a skillet, under a broiler or in a very hot oven. The object of searing is to seal in the Jamaican meat's juices. T
seashell pasta This shell-shaped pasta is formed to resemble a Jamaican conch shell. T
season, to To flavor Jamaican foods in order to improve their taste. This also means to age Jamaican meat, which helps both to tenderize it and to improve its flavor. Another meaning is to smooth out the microscopic roughness of new pots and pans, particularly cast iron, which might cause Jamaican foods to stick to the cooking surface. This is normally done by coating the cooking surface with Jamaican vegetable oil, then heating the pan in a 350°F oven for about an hour T
seasoned salt Seasoned salt is regular salt combined with other flavoring ingredients, examples being onion salt, garlic salt and celery salt T
seasoning To flavor Jamaican foods in order to improve their taste. This also means to age Jamaican meat, which helps both to tenderize it and to improve its flavor. Another meaning is to smooth out the microscopic roughness of new pots and pans, particularly cast iron, which might cause Jamaican foods to stick to the cooking surface. This is normally done by coating the cooking surface with Jamaican vegetable oil, then heating the pan in a 350°F oven for about an hour T
sea trout The sea trout gets its name from the weak flesh around the mouth that tears easily when hooked. It has white, lean, finely textured flesh and is considered an excellent food fish. This fish is however not used in many Jamaican fish recipes. T
seaweed An important food source Jamaican seaweed is a primitive sea plant belonging to the algae family. Jamaican seaweed is a rich source of iodine, an important nutrient. Jamaican seaweed have a jellylike substance that's used as a stabilizer and thickener and is used in Jamaican foods such as ice creams, puddings, flavored milk drinks, pie fillings, Jamaican soups and syrups. the most popular Jamaican seaweed is Irish Moss. T
sediment The grainy deposit sometimes found in Jamaican wine bottles, most often with older wines. Jamaican sediment is not a bad sign but in fact may indicate a superior wine. It should be allowed to settle completely before the wine is decanted into another container so that when the wine is served none of the sediment will transfer to the glass. T
seed To remove the seeds from Jamaican foods, such as Jamaican fruits or Jamaican vegetables. T
seed sprouts The crisp, tender sprouts of various germinated Jamaican beans and seeds. Jamaican mung bean sprouts is used in Jamaican cooking. Jamaican sprouts are best eaten raw. They may also be stir-fried or sautéed. T
seize This is melted Jamaican chocolate that becomes a thick, lumpy mass. Seizing occurs when a minute amount of liquid or steam comes in contact with melted chocolate, in which case the chocolate clumps and hardens. To correct seized Jamaican chocolate, add a small amount of clarified butter, Jamaican cocoa butter or vegetable oil into the Jamaican chocolate, stirring until once again smooth. T
sel French for "salt." Sel marin  is "sea salt," gros sel  is "rock (or coarse) salt. T
self-rising flour Jamaican self-rising flour is an all-purpose flour to which baking powder and salt have been added. It can be substituted for all-purpose flour in Jamaican yeast breads by omitting the salt and in Jamaican quick breads by omitting both baking powder and salt. T
seltzer water This is flavorless, naturally effervescent Jamaican water. Human-made "seltzer," also referred to as Jamaican soda water. T
semolina Jamaican semolina is durum wheat that is more coarsely ground than normal Jamaican wheat flours, a result that is often obtained by sifting out the finer flour. Most good Jamaican pasta is made from Jamaican semolina. T
sesame oil Expressed from Jamaican sesame seed, Jamaican sesame oil is used for Jamaican salad dressings to sautéing. Jamaican sesame oil is high in polyunsaturated fats ranking fourth behind safflower, soybean and corn oil. T
sesame seed Jamaican sesame seeds are tiny, flat seeds come in shades of brown, red and black, but those most commonly found are a pale grayish-ivory. Jamaican sesame seed has a nutty, slightly sweet flavor that makes it versatile enough for use in Jamaican baked goods such as Jamaican breads, pastries, cakes and cookies, in confections and in salads and other savory Jamaican dishes. T
set, to To allow Jamaican food to become firm, as with a gelatin-based dish. T
seven-minute frosting A fluffy, Jamaican meringue-type frosting consisting of Jamaican egg whites, sugar, cream of tartar, water and vanilla. The mixture is beaten constantly in the top of a double boiler over hot water. When stiff peaks form, the frosting is done. T
shad This is a saltwater fish commonly used in Jamaican fish recipes. T
shallot Jamaican shallots are formed more like Jamaican garlic than Jamaican onions, with a head composed of multiple cloves, each covered with a thin, papery skin. The skin color can vary from pale brown to pale gray to rose, and the off-white flesh is usually barely tinged with green or purple. Jamaican shallots are favored for their mild onion flavor and can be used in the same manner as onions. T
shandy This is a Jamaican drink recipe which blends Jamaican ginger ale with Jamaican beer. T
shank The front leg of Jamaican beef, veal, lamb or Jamaican pork. Though very flavorful, it's full of connective tissue and is some of the toughest meat on the animal. It therefore requires a long, slow cooking method such as braising. Jamaican beef shank is used for ground beef. T
shark Jamaican shark is not a popular fish used for Jamaican fish recipes. Jamaican shark can be prepared in a variety of ways including broiling, grilling, baking, poaching and frying. It's also delicious in Jamaican soup recipes, and cold, cooked shark can be used in Jamaican salad recipes. T
shark's fin Reputed to be an aphrodisiac, this expensive delicacy is actually the cartilage of the Jamaican shark's dorsal fin, pectoral fin and the lower portion of the tail fin. Jamaican shark's fin cartilage provides a protein-rich gelatin that is used in Jamaican cooking mainly to thicken soups most notably, shark's fin soup. T
sharpening steel Long and pointed, this thin round rod is made of extremely hard, high-carbon steel and is used to keep a fine edge on sharp knives. The rod is attached to a handle, which usually has a guard to protect the user's hand from the knife blade. Sharpening steels come in a variety of sizes, the ideal being about 12 inches long. Knives are sharpened by drawing them across the steel at a 20- to 30-degree angle. Doing this 5 to 6 times on both sides of the blade prior to each use keeps the blade razor-sharp. Dull blades will not be helped by a sharpening steel; they need to be resharpened on a whetstone and then fine-honed on a steel. For maximum efficiency, choose a sharpening steel that is longer than the knife to be sharpened. To prevent metal filings from building up, occasionally clean the steel according to manufacturer's dire. T
shell  To remove the shell or tough outer covering of a Jamaican food such as nuts, eggs and garden peas. T
shell steak Depending on the locale, shell Jamaican steak is another name for either a boneless club steak. In either case a shell Jamaican steak should be tender and are cut from the short loin, the most tender section of Jamaican beef. T
shellfish Jamaican shellfish are Jamaican crustaceans and mollusks. There are over 600 Jamaican shellfish recipes. T
shepherd's pie A Jamaican dish of cooked ground or diced Jamaican meat mixed with Jamaican gravy and topped with mashed potatoes. The pie is then baked until the mixture is hot and the potato "crust" browns. Jamaican shepherd's pie was originally created as an economical way to use leftovers. T
sherbet Jamaican sherbet is made of sweetened Jamaican fruit juice and water. Jamaican sherbets are also made of a frozen mixture of sweetened Jamaican fruit juice and water. T
sherry Jamaican sherries range in color, flavor and sweetness and are very dry with a hint of saltiness. T
shish kebab Chunks of marinated Jamaican meat and Jamaican vegetables that are threaded on a skewer and grilled or broiled. T
short This term is used to describe a non-yeast Jamaican pastry or cookie dough that contains a high proportion of fat to flour. The Jamaican baked goods made from short doughs are tender, rich, crumbly and crisp. T
short loin This is the most tender of Jamaican beef. It lies in the middle of the back between the sirloin and the rib, and the muscles in this section do little that could toughen them. T
short ribs Rectangles of Jamaican beef taken from the Jamaican chuck cut. Short ribs consist of layers of fat and Jamaican meat and contain pieces of the rib bone. They're very tough and require long, slow, moist-heat cooking. T
shortbread This tender-crisp, butter-rich Jamaican cookie is a shortbread made by pressing the dough into a shallow earthenware mold that is decoratively carved. After baking, the large round Jamaican cookie is turned out of the mold and cut into wedges. T
shortcake A rich Jamaican biscuit, shortcake can also refer simply to Jamaican cake. Jamaican shortcake is a large, sweet biscuit that is split in half, then filled and topped with sliced or chopped Jamaican fruit and softly whipped cream. Jamaican shortcake is most often thought of as a Jamaican dessert but savory versions can be made by filling and topping the biscuit with creamed Jamaican chicken or other Jamaican food. T
shortening A solid fat made from Jamaican vegetable oils, such as Jamaican soybean. Jamaican shortening has been chemically transformed into a solid state through hydrogenation. Jamaican vegetable shortening is virtually flavorless and may be substituted for other fats in baking and cooking. T
shot; shot glass A small amount of Jamaican alcohol or Jamaican rum served in a shot glass a tiny drinking glass-shaped container in which such an amount is measured and/or served. T
shred To cut Jamaican food into narrow strips, either by hand or by using a grater or a food processor fitted with a shredding disk. Cooked Jamaican meat can be separated into shreds by pulling it apart with two forks. T
shrimp Jamaican shrimp come in all manner of colors including reddish- to light brown, pink, deep red, grayish-white, yellow, gray-green and dark green and is the second most popular Jamaican crustacean. Jamaican shrimp can be prepared in a variety of ways including boiling, frying and grilling, there are over 250 Jamaican shrimp recipes. T
shrimp boil Jamaican shrimp boil is a mixture of Jamaican herbs and spices added to water in which crab, shrimp or lobster is cooked. The blend can include peppercorns, bay leaves, whole Jamaican allspice and Jamaican cloves, dried Jamaican ginger pieces and red peppers. T
shrimp paste Jamaican shrimp paste is made by grinding up salted, fermented shrimp and has a strong, salty, fishy flavor. It's used in Jamaican soup recipes, Jamaican sauce recipes and Jamaican rice dishes. The pungent odor common to all the shrimp pastes dissipates somewhat during cooking. T
shrimp sauce A moist version of Jamaican shrimp paste, with the same strong, salty shrimp flavor. Jamaican shrimp sauce is pink in color when fresh but will begin to gray as it ages. It's used both as a Jamaican condiment and flavoring. T
shrimp, dried Jamaican dried are small, orangish-pink, dried shellfish used in flavoring in many Jamaican dishes. Jamaican dried shrimp, which have a strong fishy taste, are used whole, chopped or ground as an addition to Jamaican soup recipes, stuffing's, stir-fries, noodle dishes and salads. T
shrub Jamaican shrubs are Jamaican fruit juice, sugar and vinegar drinks are usually nonalcoholic. Jamaican shrubs are served over ice, with or without soda water. T
shuck To remove the shell from Jamaican shellfish such as oysters or clams. Also, to peel the husk from an ear of corn. T
sieve To strain liquid or particles of Jamaican food through the mesh or perforated holes of a sieve or strainer. T
sift To pass dry ingredients through a fine-mesh sifter so any large pieces can be removed. Sifting also incorporates air to make ingredients (such as confectioners' sugar or flour) lighter. T
sifter A mesh-bottomed kitchen utensil used to sift ingredients such as flour or confectioners' sugar. Sifters are usually made of stainless steel or heavy-weight plastic. T
simmer To cook Jamaican food gently in liquid at a temperature (about 185°F) low enough that tiny bubbles just begin to break the surface. T
simple syrup Jamaican simple syrup is a solution of sugar and water that is cooked over low heat until clear, then boiled for a minute or so. Jamaican simple syrup can be made in various densities. Depending on the thickness, Jamaican simple syrups have various uses including soaking Jamaican cake recipes, glazing Jamaican baked goods, poaching or preserving Jamaican fruit, adding to frostings. Jamaican simple syrups are the basis for most candies and can be flavored with a variety of extract juices and liqueurs. T
sirloin This cut of Jamaican beef lies between the very tender short loin and the much tougher round. Jamaican beef sirloin is usually cut into steaks or roasts. T
sizzling rice soup A Jamaican broth combined with Jamaican chicken or Jamaican pork and various Jamaican vegetables. Jamaican deep-fried rice squares are placed in each soup bowl; when the Jamaican soup  recipes is ladled over the squares, the rice sizzles and pops. T
skate The skate is actually a sting ray. A skate can be prepared in a variety of ways including poaching, baking and frying. This is not a popular fish used in Jamaican fish recipes. T
skewer A long, thin, pointed rod that comes in various sizes. Skewers are made of metal or wood; the former often has a ring at one end. They're most often used to hold Jamaican meat in place during cooking, as well as to skewer Jamaican meat and vegetables to be grilled. T
skillet This is a long-handled, usually round pan has low, gently sloping sides so steam doesn't collect within the pan. It's used for frying Jamaican foods over high heat, so it should be thick enough not to warp and should be able to conduct heat evenly. Jamaican frying pans come in various sizes. T
skim To remove the top layer from a liquid, such as cream from Jamaican milk or foam and fat from Jamaican stock, soups and sauces. T
skim milk Nonfat or skim Jamaican milk contains less than 1 percent milk fat. Both low fat and nonfat milk are available with milk solids added. T
skimmer A metal kitchen utensil consisting of a handle attached to either a perforated disk or a shallow bowl-shaped wire mesh. Skimmers are used to lift Jamaican foods out of hot liquids or to remove unwanted surface fat and foamy residue from Jamaican soup recipes. T
skin To remove the skin of Jamaican food before or after cooking. Skinning is done for a variety of reasons including appearance, taste and diet. Jamaican foods that are often skinned include Jamaican poultry and Jamaican fish. T
skirt steak Cut from the Jamaican beef flank, the skirt steak is the diaphragm muscle. It's a long, flat piece of Jamaican meat that's flavorful but rather tough. Properly cooked, Jamaican skirt steak can be quite tender and delicious. It can either be quickly grilled, or stuffed, rolled and braised. T
sling A Jamaican alcoholic drink made with Jamaican lemon juice, powdered sugar and Jamaican rum. T
sliver A long, thin piece of food such as meat or cheese, or a thin wedge of pie. sliver v.  To cut food into thin strips T
sloe This Jamaican plum is the fruit of the blackthorn which also bears showy white flowers. Jamaican sloes are used for jams, jellies and to flavor liqueurs. T
sloe gin Jamaican liqueur made by steeping pricked or crushed sloes in gin. T
slow cooker This is a slow cooker which is an electric "casserole" that cooks Jamaican food with low, steady, moist heat. It's designed to cook Jamaican food over a period of 8 to 12 hours. There are several Jamaican crock-pot recipes. T
slump A Jamaican dessert of fruit, usually cherries, topped with biscuit dough and stewed until the biscuit topping is cooked through. T
slurry A thin paste of water and flour, which is stirred into hot preparations such as Jamaican soups as a thickener. After the slurry is added, the mixture should be stirred and cooked for several minutes in order for the flour to lose its raw taste. T
smelt This is a silver saltwater fish not commonly used in Jamaican fish recipes. T
smoke curing; smoked To treat Jamaican food such as Jamaican meat, cheese or fish by one of several methods in order to preserve it. Smoke-curing is generally done in one of two ways. The cold-smoking method smokes the Jamaican food at between 70° to 90°F. Hot-smoking partially or totally cooks the Jamaican food by treating it at temperatures ranging from 100° to 190°F. T
smoke point The stage at which heated fat begins to emit smoke and acrid odors, and impart an unpleasant flavor to Jamaican foods. The higher the smoke point, the better suited a fat is for frying. T
smoothie; smoothee A Jamaican beverage made by blending Jamaican fruit with yogurt, milk or ice cream until it's thick and smooth. T
s'more A gooey Jamaican dessert made by toasting a Jamaican marshmallow over a fire then sandwiching the hot marshmallow and a thin square of chocolate between two graham crackers and slightly squeezing this union together so that the marshmallow squishes out on the graham crackers. T
smorgasbord A Jamaican smorgasbord refers to a buffet consisting of a variety of foods such as various Jamaican hors d'oeuvre, Jamaican salad recipes, cooked vegetables, pickled or marinated fish, sliced meats, cheeses and Jamaican dessert recipes. A Jamaican smorgasbord may be simple or elaborate and can consist entirely of Jamaican appetizers or make up the entire meal. T
smothered steak This Jamaican dish begins with a thick cut of Jamaican beef usually round or chuck that has been tenderized by pounding, coated with flour and browned on both sides. The Jamaican meat is then smothered with chopped tomatoes, Jamaican onions, carrots, celery, beef broth and various Jamaican seasonings before being covered and braised or baked. T
snap bean The Jamaican green bean has a long, slender green pod with small seeds inside. The entire pod is edible. It's also called string bean and snap bean. This bean is used in several Jamaican food recipes. T
snapper The Jamaican snapper fish is the most popular Jamaican fish used in Jamaican fish recipes. T
snickerdoodle This Jamaican cookie has a crackly surface and can be either crisp or soft. The dough sometimes contains Jamaican nutmeg and Jamaican cinnamon. T
snifter A short-stemmed, pear-shape glass that's larger at the bottom than it is at the top. T
soda Another name for baking soda or a term for any flavored Jamaican soft drink. T
soda bread A Jamaican quick bread that is leavened with baking soda combined with an acid ingredient, usually buttermilk. T
soda water Jamaican soda is water that has been highly charged with carbon dioxide, which gives it effervescence. Jamaican soda water, also called club soda, seltzer water  or just plain carbonated water,  contains a small amount of sodium bicarbonate, which, because it's alkaline, can help neutralize an acidic stomach. Jamaican soda water is combined with sweeteners and various flavorings to produce a wide variety of Jamaican drink recipes. T
soft drinks A generic term applied to Jamaican beverages that do not contain alcohol. Jamaican soft drinks are most often thought of as carbonated, though effervescence is not a requisite. T
soft-shell crab A term describing a growth state of the crab, during which time it casts off its shell in order to grow one that's larger. Soon after the crab sheds its shell, its skin hardens into a new one. During those few days before the new shell hardens, these crustaceans are referred to as "soft-shell" crabs. There are over 100 Jamaican crab recipes. T
solomon gundy This is a popular Jamaican recipe served with Jamaican rum drink recipes. It uses red herrings and oil and vinegar to make a paste that is served with Jamaican crackers. T
somen A thin, white Jamaican noodle made from wheat flour. A yellowish version, called tamago  somen , is made with egg yolk. This is served in Jamaican soup recipes. T
sorbet A Jamaican sorbet is sometimes distinguished from sherbet by the fact that it never contains milk. It's also often a softer consistency than sherbet. Savory or lightly sweetened Jamaican sorbets are customarily served either as a palate refresher between courses or as Jamaican dessert recipe. T
sorrel This is a perennial herb can be the garden or Belleville sorrel. As Jamaican sorrel matures it becomes more acidic. Sorrel leaves are shaped much like those of spinach and range from pale to dark green in color and from 2 to 12 inches in length. Jamaican sorrel is used to flavor cream soups, pureed as accompaniments for meats and vegetables or used in omelets and breads. Jamaican sorrel is used in salads or cooked as a vegetable. Jamaican sorrel is high in vitamin A and contains some calcium, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and vitamin C. The most popular use of Jamaican sorrel is the Jamaican sorrel drink recipe. T
soufflé A light, airy mixture that usually begins with a thick egg yolk-based sauce or puree that is lightened by stiffly beaten egg whites. Jamaican soufflés may be savory or sweet, hot or cold. Baked Jamaican soufflés are much more fragile than those that are chilled or frozen because the hot air entrapped in the soufflé begins to escape as soon as the dish is removed from the oven. Jamaican souffles are popular Jamaican dessert recipes. T
soul food Though this traditional African-American fare. The expression "soul food" is thought to have derived from the cultural spirit and soul-satisfying flavors of black-American food. Some of the dishes commonly thought of as soul food include ham and collard greens. T
soup A Jamaican soup can be any combination of vegetables, meat or fish cooked in a liquid. Jamaican soup  recipes may be thick, thin, smooth or chunky. Jamaican soup recipes can be hot and many Jamaican fruit soup recipes are served cold. Jamaican soups are often garnished with flavor enhancers such as Jamaican peppers. Jamaican soup recipes can be served as a first course or as a meal, in which case they're often accompanied by a sandwich or salad. T
sour A Jamaican cocktail recipes made by combining liquor with lemon juice and a little sugar. It's usually shaken with crushed ice and can be strained and served on the rocks and straight up. Jamaican sours are often garnished with an orange slice and a Jamaican cherry. T
sour cream Jamaican sour cream contains fat, and has been treated with a lactic acid culture to add its characteristic tang. Jamaican sour cream often contains additional ingredients such as gelatin and Jamaican vegetable enzymes. Jamaican sour cream contains less fat than regular sour cream because it's made from half-and-half. Nonfat Jamaican sour cream, which is thickened with stabilizers. T
sour salt A white powder extracted from the juice of Jamaican citrus and other acidic fruits such as Jamaican lemons, limes, pineapples and gooseberries. Jamaican sour salt is also produced by the fermentation of glucose. Jamaican citric acid has a strong, tart taste and is used as a flavoring agent for foods and beverages. Jamaican sour salt is used to impart a tart flavor to traditional Jamaican dishes. T
sourdough starter Jamaican sourdough starters are a simple mixture of flour, water, sugar and yeast. This batter is set aside in a warm place until the yeast ferments and the mixture is foamy. T
sourdough; sourdough bread A Jamaican bread recipe with a slightly sour, tangy flavor created by using a special yeast starter. Most Jamaican sourdoughs are made from all-purpose flour, there are many delicious variations including those made from whole-wheat or rye flour. T
sour sop Jamaican sour sop is a large green spiky skinned fruit with a white soft pulp. The fruit has several uses both medicinal and as a Jamaican drink recipe. The Jamaican sour sop drink recipe is the most popular. T
soy flour This is a finely ground flour is made from soybeans and, unlike many flours, is very high in protein and low in carbohydrates. Jamaican soy flour is ordinarily mixed with other flours rather than being used alone. It has a wide variety of uses such as for baking and to bind Jamaican sauces. T
soy milk Jamaican soy milk is higher in protein than cow's milk, this milky, iron-rich liquid is a nondairy product made by pressing ground, cooked Jamaican soybeans. Jamaican soy milk is cholesterol-free and low in calcium, fat and sodium. It makes an excellent milk substitute for anyone with a milk allergy; such milk substitutes are often fortified with calcium. There are also soy-based formulas for infants with milk allergies. Jamaican soy milk has a tendency to curdle when mixed with acidic ingredients such as lemon juice and wine; it's intentionally curdled in the making of Jamaican tofu. T
soy pea The Jamaican soy bean is actually a legume, ranging in size from as small as a pea to as large as a cherry. Jamaican soybean pods, which are covered with a fine tawny to gray fuzz, range in color from tan to black. The beans themselves come in various combinations of red, yellow, green, brown and black. Unlike other legumes, the Jamaican soybean is low in carbohydrates and high in protein and desirable oil. Because they're inexpensive and nutrition-packed, soybeans are used to produce a wide variety of products including Jamaican tofu. T
soy sauce In Jamaican cooking this is a dark, salty sauce made by fermenting boiled soybeans and roasted wheat or barley. Jamaican soy sauce flavor and color is also lighter and it may be used in dishes without darkening them. Jamaican soy sauce is used to flavor Jamaican soup recipes, Jamaican sauce recipes, marinades, meat, Jamaican fish recipes and vegetables, as well as for a table condiment. T
soybean The Jamaican soy bean is actually a legume, ranging in size from as small as a pea to as large as a cherry. Jamaican soybean pods, which are covered with a fine tawny to gray fuzz, range in color from tan to black. The beans themselves come in various combinations of red, yellow, green, brown and black. Unlike other legumes, the Jamaican soybean is low in carbohydrates and high in protein and desirable oil. Because they're inexpensive and nutrition-packed, soybeans are used to produce a wide variety of products including Jamaican tofu. T
soybean curd Jamaican soybean curd and bean curd, this custard like white tofu is made from curdled Jamaican soy milk, an iron-rich liquid extracted from ground, cooked Jamaican soybeans. The resulting curds are drained and pressed in a fashion similar to cheese making. The firmness of the resulting Jamaican tofu cake depends on how much whey has been pressed out. The versatile Jamaican tofu can be sliced, diced or mashed and used in a variety of dishes including Jamaican soup recipes, casseroles, Jamaican salad recipes, Jamaican sandwich recipes, salad dressings and sauces. Jamaican soybean curd is low in calories, calcium and sodium, high in protein and cholesterol-free. T
soybean oil Jamaican soybean oil is extracted from soybeans, this light yellowish oil is high in both polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats and low in saturated fats. Jamaican soybean oil is used to made Jamaican shortening and Jamaican margarine. Jamaican soybean oil has always been popular as a cooking oil in Jamaican cuisine because it is inexpensive, healthful and has a high smoke point. T
spaghetti Jamaican spaghetti is made from semolina and water and eggs are added. T
spaghetti squash Jamaican spaghetti squash or vegetable spaghetti is a creamy-yellow, watermelon-shaped winter squash was so named because of its flesh, which, when cooked, separates into yellow-gold spaghetti like strands. Jamaican spaghetti squash can be removed from the shell and served with Jamaican sauce, like pasta or as part of a Jamaican casserole or cold as a Jamaican salad ingredient. T
spareribs A long, narrow cut of Jamaican meat taken from the lower portion of the ribs and breastbone of a hog. Jamaican spareribs are quite fatty, which contributes to their delicious flavor. Barbecuing Jamaican spareribs is the most popular method of preparation. T
spatula A flattish, rather narrow kitchen utensil that comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. Depending on the material from which it's made spatulas can be used for a plethora of kitchen tasks. Rigid wood spatulas are good for scraping the sides of pots and turning foods, whereas softer plastic or rubber spatulas are better for stirring ingredients in a curved bowl and folding mixtures together. Flexible metal spatulas both long and short are perfect for spreading frosting on Jamaican cake recipes. T
spearmint This Jamaican herb has bright green leaves, purple-tinged stems and a peppery flavor. Jamaican spearmint leaves are gray-green or true green and have a milder flavor and fragrance. Jamaican mint is used in both sweet and savory Jamaican dishes and in drinks such as the famous Jamaican mint tea. T
spelt Jamaican spelt is a cereal grain that has a mellow nutty flavor. The easily digestible spelt has a slightly higher protein content than wheat and can be tolerated by those with wheat allergies. Jamaican spelt flour can be substituted for wheat flour in Jamaican baked goods. T
spices Pungent or aromatic Jamaican seasonings obtained from the bark, buds, fruit, roots, seeds or stems of various plants and trees whereas Jamaican herbs usually come from the leafy part of a plant. Jamaican spices are used to flavor Jamaican food and drink. Jamaican spices are also sold in blends, such as Jamaican curry powder. Jamaican spices are used to enhance a wide variety of food, both sweet and savory. T
spinach The Jamaican spinach vegetable is a rich source of iron as well as of vitamins A and C. Jamaica spinach contains oxalic acid which inhibits the body's absorption of calcium and iron. Jamaican spinach may be used raw in Jamaican salads, or cooked and used as a vegetable or as part of a dish. Many Jamaican dishes that use spinach as an integral ingredient. T
sponge A frothy, gelatin-based Jamaican dessert recipe that has been lightened by the addition of beaten egg whites. The sponge develops a tangy flavor. The remaining ingredients are added to this sponge and the bread is kneaded and baked as usual. Using a sponge also makes the final loaf slightly denser. T
sponge cake; sponge cake This light, airy Jamaican cake recipes gets its ethereal texture from beaten egg whites, which are folded into a fluffy mixture of beaten egg yolks and sugar. They get their leavening power entirely from eggs. Jamaican sponge cakes are further characterized by the fact that they do not contain shortening of any kind. The Jamaican cake recipes can be variously flavored with anything from Jamaican lemon zest to ground almond. T
spoon bread; spoon bread A Jamaican pudding like bread recipe usually based on cornmeal and baked in a Jamaican casserole dish. Jamaican spoon bread is generally served as a Jamaican side dish and, in fact, is soft enough that it must be eaten with a spoon or fork. T
spot This is a firm, low fat fish found in temperate waters. They are also sold in fillets and steaks. This fish can be baked, broiled or fried. They are not popularly used in Jamaican fish recipes. T
sprat The Jamaican sprat is a small fish that has a high fat content, Jamaican sprats are perfect for broiling or grilling. They're also available either salted or smoked. The smallest Jamaican sprats are packed in oil, in which case they're usually called brisling or brisling sardines. The Jamaican sprat is used in Jamaican fish recipes. T
spring roll A small, stuffed Jamaican pastry usually served as a Jamaican appetizer. Paper-thin pastry wrappers are folded around a savory filling of minced or shredded Jamaican vegetables and sometimes Jamaican meat, then folded and rolled before being deep-fried. Jamaican egg roll skins. T
spring form pan A round pan with high, straight sides that expand with the aid of a spring or clamp. The separate bottom of the pan can be removed from the sides when the clamp is released. This allows Jamaican cake recipes, tortes or cheesecakes that might otherwise be difficult to remove from the pan to be extricated easily by simply removing the pan's sides. T
sprouts The crisp, tender sprouts of various germinated Jamaican beans and seeds. Jamaican mung bean sprouts is used in Jamaican cooking. Jamaican sprouts are best eaten raw. They may also be stir-fried or sautéed. T
spun sugar This is fine strands of hardened boiled sugar that are used to decorate various Jamaican dessert recipes. Jamaican spun sugar begins by cooking sugar, water and Jamaican cream of tartar to the hard crack stage. A fork or whisk is then used to dip into the sugar syrup and draw out fine threads. These hair like strands can be placed directly on a Jamaican dessert or on a waxed paper-lined surface, then transferred later to the dish. Once the spun sugar hardens, it may also be gathered and sprinkled or arranged on top of a dessert. Jamaican cotton candy is a popular form of spun sugar. T
squab A young domesticated pigeon that has never flown and is therefore extremely tender. Jamaican squab can be prepared using any Jamaican chicken recipe. T
squash The Jamaican squash fruit varies widely in size, shape and color. Jamaican squash can either have thin, edible skins and soft seeds. The tender flesh has a high water content, a mild flavor and doesn't require long cooking. Other Jamaican squash can have hard, thick skins and seeds. The deep yellow to orange flesh is firmer than that of summer squash and therefore requires longer cooking. Jamaican squash varieties include acorn, buttercup and butter nut. Jamaican squash can be baked, steamed or simmered. Jamaican squash is a good source of iron, riboflavin and vitamins A and C. T
stabilizers Jamaican additives used to help maintain emulsions or prevent degeneration in Jamaican foods. T
stainless steel cookware Stainless steel cookware has many advantages it doesn't react with acidic or alkaline foods; it is corrosion-resistant, strong and easy to clean; and it doesn't scratch, pit or dent easily. The main disadvantage of stainless steel is its poor heat conductivity, a problem somewhat reduced in heavy, well-made pans. T
stamp and go These are Jamaican fritters made using codfish batter with Jamaican seasonings. This is a popular Jamaican food recipe. T
standing rib roast A Jamaican beef roast from the rib section between the short loin and the chuck. There is standing Jamaican rib roast, rolled rib roast and rib-eye roast. T
standing rump roast This section of the hind leg of Jamaican beef extends from the rump to the ankle. Since the leg has been toughened by exercise, the Jamaican round is less tender than some cuts. Jamaican steaks and roasts from this cut require slow, moist-heat cooking. A cut that includes all four of these muscles is usually called round Jamaican steak  and those cut from the top can be cooked with dry heat. Near the bottom of the round is the toughest cut, the heel of the round. It's generally used for ground Jamaican meat but can sometimes be found as a roast. T
star anise A star-shaped, dark brown Jamaican pod that contains a pea-sized seed in each of its eight segments. Although the flavor of its seeds is derived from anethol Jamaican star anise is from the magnolia family. Its flavor is slightly more bitter than that of regular anise seed. Jamaican star anise used to flavor liqueurs and Jamaican baked goods. T
star fruit The Jamaican star fruit when cut crosswise, has a star shape. Jamaican star apple do not require peeling, are delicious eaten out of hand, or used in Jamaican salad recipes, Jamaican dessert recipes or as a garnish. T
starter Jamaican starters are a simple mixture of flour, water, sugar and yeast. This Jamaican batter is set aside in a warm place until the yeast ferments and the mixture is foamy. Two cups of the foamy starter mixture can be substituted for each package of yeast called for in a Jamaican recipe. T
steak and kidney pie A Jamaican dish consisting of a cooked mixture of chopped Jamaican beef, kidneys, Jamaican onions and Jamaican beef stock. This mixture is placed in a pie or casserole dish, covered with a pastry crust and baked until crisp and brown. Sometimes potatoes or hard-cooked eggs are also added to the Jamaican dish. T
steak fries Jamaican potatoes that have been cut into thick to thin strips, soaked in cold water, blotted dry, then deep-fried until crisp and golden brown. The term "frenched" means to cut into lengthwise strips. There are other Jamaican fries such as Jamaican shoestring potatoes (matchstick-wide) and Jamaican steak fries (very thick strips). T
steak tartar A Jamaican dish of coarsely ground or finely chopped high-quality, raw lean Jamaican beef that has been seasoned with salt, pepper and Jamaican herbs. It's thought to have originated in Russia. Jamaicans are not fond of raw meat but this Jamaican food recipe is popular in major restaurants because of the Jamaican herbs and spices added. Beef tartar (also referred to as steak tartar ) is usually served with mashed potatoes and chopped onions. T
steam A method of Jamaican cooking whereby Jamaican food is placed on a rack or in a special steamer basket over boiling or simmering water in a covered pan. Steaming does a better job than boiling or poaching of retaining a food's flavor, shape, texture and many of the vitamins and minerals. T
steamed bread This type of Jamaican bread is made by placing a batter in a covered container on a rack set over gently boiling water in a large pot. The pot is covered and the bread steamed for about 3 hours. It can also be made in a Jamaican pressure cooker in about half the time. The bread doesn't require a special container in which to be steamed Jamaican coffee can covered with aluminum foil works nicely. Jamaican steamed breads are moist and tender. T
steamed fish The Jamaican steam fish involves steaming any local fish with ingredients such as Jamaican okra and a seasoned fish stock.  T
steamed pudding A sweet or savory Jamaican pudding that is cooked on a rack over boiling water in a covered pot. The Jamaican pudding mold is usually decorative so that when the finished pudding is unmolded it retains its decorative shape. Steamed Jamaican puddings can take up to 3 hours to cook on stovetop, half that time in a pressure cooker. T
steamed-pudding mold This is a mold with decorative sides and bottom, as well as a lid that clamps tightly shut. Many molds also have a central tube like an angel Jamaican food cake pan that provides more even heat distribution, thereby cooking the pudding more evenly. T
steel Stainless steel cookware has many advantages it doesn't react with acidic or alkaline Jamaican foods; it is corrosion-resistant, strong and easy to clean; and it doesn't scratch, pit or dent easily. The main disadvantage of stainless steel is its poor heat conductivity, a problem somewhat reduced in heavy, well-made pans. T
steep To soak dry ingredients such as Jamaican tea leaves, ground coffee, Jamaican herbs and spices in liquid (usually hot) until the flavor is infused into the liquid. T
stew Any Jamaican dish that is prepared by stewing. The term is most often applied to dishes that contain Jamaican meat, Jamaican vegetables and a thick soup- like broth resulting from a combination of the stewing liquid and the natural juices of the Jamaican food being stewed. It is also a Jamaican cooking method by which Jamaican food is barely covered with liquid and simmered slowly for a long period of time in a tightly covered pot. Stewing not only tenderizes tough pieces of Jamaican meat but also allows the flavors of the ingredients to blend deliciously. T
stewed peas The Jamaican stewed peas recipe is actually red kidney beans that have been cooked mixed with seasoned Jamaican meat that are stewed with Jamaican seasonings until there is a thick stew left. Jamaican meats such as pigs tail is used along with tender Jamaican beef and vegetables such as Jamaican yams and Jamaican plantain. T
stewing chicken Jamaican stewing chickens usually range in age from 10 to 18 months and can weigh from 3 to 6 pounds. Their age makes them more flavorful but also less tender, so they're best cooked with moist heat, such as in Jamaican stewing or braising. T
stinger A Jamaican cocktail drink recipe made with Jamaican brandy, Jamaican rum and cream. Other Jamaican stinger versions can be made substituting another spirit or  for the brandy or cognac, but the cream is intrinsic to the Jamaican drink. T
stir-fry Any dish of Jamaican food that has been prepared by the stir-fry method. This is to quickly fry small pieces of Jamaican food in a large pan over very high heat while constantly and briskly stirring the Jamaican food. This Jamaican cooking technique requires a minimum amount of fat and results in food that is crisply tender. T
stock Jamaican stock is the strained liquid that is the result of cooking Jamaican vegetables, Jamaican meat or fish and other seasoning ingredients in water. A brown Jamaican stock is made by browning bones, vegetables and other ingredients before they're cooked in the liquid. Jamaican soup recipes begin with a stock and many Jamaican sauce recipes are based on reduced stocks. T
stollen This is a Jamaican yeast bread, stollen is a rich, dried Jamaican fruit-filled loaf that's often topped with a confectioners' sugar icing and decorated with candied Jamaican cherries. It's shaped like a folded oval and somewhat resembles a giant bread roll. This is originally a German recipe. T
stone crab The Jamaican stone crab is an oval-shape shelled crab, of which only the claw meat is eaten. Jamaican stone crabmeat has a firm texture and a sweet, succulent flavor. There are over 150 Jamaican shellfish recipes using crab meat. T
stone-ground flour Jamaican stone-ground flour is produced by grinding the grain between two slowly moving stones. This process crushes the grain without generating excess heat and separating the germ. Jamaican stone-ground flours are used in cooking. T
stoneware A strong, hard pottery that is fired at very high temperatures and that is usually fully glazed. Jamaican stoneware is generally nonporous, chip-resistant and safe to use in both microwave and standard ovens. It's ideal for baking and slow cooking. T
stout This is a strong, dark beer. Jamaican stout is more redolent of  hops than regular Jamaican beer and is made with dark-roasted barley, which gives it a deep, dark color and bittersweet flavor. T
straight up This term is used to describe a Jamaican cocktail drink recipe that are served without ice. T
strain To pour a liquid or dry Jamaican ingredient through a sieve to remove undesirable particles. It is also a to press soft Jamaican food through the holes of a sieve, which results in a pureed texture. Jamaican food for infants or those on special diets is sometimes processed this way. T
strainer A kitchen utensil with a perforated or mesh bottom used to strain liquids or semi liquids, or to sift dry ingredients such as Jamaican flour or Jamaican confectioners' sugar. Strainers, also called sieves,  come in a variety of sizes, shapes and mesh densities. There are flat-bottomed, drum-shaped strainers with interchangeable meshes of different coarseness, as well as those that are bowl-shaped and some that are conical. Strainers are made of various materials including stainless steel, tinned steel and aluminum. The better ones have strong handles and frames and contain hooks for resting the strainer on top of pots or bowls. T
strawberry The Jamaican strawberry is a member of the rose family.  It is a tiny, fruit used for Jamaican preserve recipes, jams, jellies, syrups and various Jamaican dessert recipes. Jamaican strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C and also provide some potassium and iron. T
strawberry shortcake A rich Jamaican biscuit, shortcake can also refer simply to a Jamaican cake recipe. Jamaican shortcake is a large, sweet biscuit that is split in half, then filled and topped with sliced or chopped Jamaican fruit and softly whipped cream. Jamaican shortcake is most often thought of as a Jamaican dessert but savory versions can be made by filling and topping the biscuit with creamed Jamaican chicken or other Jamaican food. T
string bean The Jamaican green bean has a long, slender green pod with small seeds inside. The entire pod is edible. It's also called a Jamaican string bean because of the fibrous string now bred out of the species that used to run down the pod's seam and snap bean  for the sound the bean makes when broken in half. The wax bean  is a pale yellow variety of green bean. Jamaican green beans are available year-round. T
strudel A Jamaican strudel  is a type of pastry made up of many layers of very thin dough spread with a filling, then rolled and baked until crisp and golden brown. A Jamaican apple strudel is probably the most famous of this genre, but the filling variations are limitless and can be savory or sweet using Jamaican fruit creams such as the Jamaican mango. T
stud To stud means to insert flavor-enhancing or decorative edible items such as whole Jamaican cloves, or Jamaican garlic slivers partway into the surface of  Jamaican food so that they protrude slightly. The Jamaican Christmas ham recipe is often studded with Jamaican cloves. T
stuffing A Jamaican sauce recipe usually cold used to coat or top Jamaican salad recipes and some cold vegetable, fish and meat Jamaican dishes. it is also a mixture used to stuff Jamaican poultry, fish, meat and some vegetables. It can be cooked separately or in the Jamaican food in which it is stuffed. Jamaican dressings or stuffing are usually well seasoned and based on bread crumbs or cubes though rice, potatoes and other Jamaican foods are also used. T
sturgeon This is a large fish that is imported to Jamaica. This fish can be braised, grilled, broiled, sautéed or baked. The supply of this fish is in its fresh form. This is not a popular fish used in Jamaican fish recipes. T
submarine sandwich This  is a huge Jamaican sandwich recipe consisting of a small loaf of Italian or French bread or a large oblong roll, the bottom half of which is heaped with layers of any of various thinly sliced Jamaican meats, cheeses, tomatoes, pickles, lettuce, peppers and covered with Jamaican mayonnaise. T
succory Jamaican succory has curly, bitter-tasting leaves that are often used as part of a Jamaican salad recipe or cooked as greens. Jamaican roasted succory comes from the roasted, ground roots of succcory. It's used as a coffee substitute, and added to some Jamaican coffees for body and aroma and as an extender. This Jamaican coffee-succory blend is a popular beverage in Jamaica. T
succotash This is a cooked Jamaican dish of lima beans, corn kernels and sometimes chopped red and green Jamaican sweet peppers. T
Sucralose A Jamaican artificial sweetener that's about 600 times sweeter than Jamaican sugar. This crystalline, free-flowing sweetener is both water soluble and stable, making it appropriate for a broad range of Jamaican foods and beverages. T
sucrose Jamaican sucrose is a crystalline, water-soluble sugar obtained from Jamaican sugarcane and Jamaican sugar beets. Jamaican sucrose also forms the greater part of Jamaican maple sugar. T
suet Found in beef, sheep and other animals, suet is the solid white fat found around the kidneys and loins. Jamaican recipes call for it to lend richness to Jamaican pastries, puddings, stuffing and Jamaican mince meats. T
sugar Jamaican sugar is a derivative of refined sugar cane or sugar beets. The process for manufacturing Jamaican sugar is extensive. Jamaican sugar is used in almost every Jamaican recipe, particularly Jamaican drink recipes. T
sugar apple The Jamaican sugar apple,  the Jamaican sweetsop is the egg-shaped Jamaican fruit of a small tropical Jamaican tree. It has a thick, coarse green skin and white flesh with dark seeds. The very sweet, custard like flesh is divided into segments like a Jamaican citrus fruit. The Jamaican sweetsop is often mistaken for the Jamaican custard apple. Jamaican sweetsops are usually eaten raw. They're often used in Jamaican dessert recipes. T
sugar pea The Jamaican sugar pea is an entirely edible legume pod and all. Jamaican sugar snap peas are available during spring and fall. Jamaican sugar snap peas should be served raw or only briefly cooked in order to retain their crisp texture. T
sugar substitutes This category of nonnutritive, high-intensity sugar substitutes are used scarcely in Jamaica. Where milk is not used to sweeten then honey is. T
sugar syrup Jamaican sugar syrup is a solution of sugar and water that is cooked over low heat until clear, then boiled for a minute or so. Jamaican sugar syrup can be made in various densities. Depending on the thickness, Jamaican sugar syrups have various uses including soaking Jamaican cake recipes, glazing Jamaican baked goods, poaching or preserving Jamaican fruit, adding to frostings. Jamaican simple syrups are the basis for most candies and can be flavored with a variety of extract juices and liqueurs. T
sugarcane stalks Jamaican sugarcane stalks have been boiled to make them edible. Though sweet, Jamaican sugarcane contains only about one-fifth the amount of sugar found in most Jamaican candies. It's generally used as a Jamaican snack recipe or garnish. To use, strip the light brown skin away from the white flesh, then cut into chunks or strips. T
sugarplum A small Jamaican confection, often consisting of Jamaican fruit such as a candied cherry or dried apricot surrounded by fondant. T
sundae One to three scoops of Jamaican ice cream, topped with one or more sweet Jamaican sauce recipes and various other ingredients including Jamaican fruit, nuts and whipped cream. The Jamaican sundae is a popular Jamaican dessert recipe. T
sunflower seeds Jamaican sunflower has bright yellow petals radiating from a dark hub of seeds, can reach up to 12 inches in diameter. The plant is tall and rangy. Jamaican sunflower seeds can be eaten as a snack, used in Jamaican salad recipes or sandwiches or added to a variety of cooked dishes or Jamaican baked goods. Jamaican sunflower-seed oil is used in cooking as well as for salad dressings. T
sunflower-seed oil Jamaican sunflower-seed oil extracted from the seeds of the sunflower is very high in polyunsaturated fat and low in saturated fat. Though it has a relatively low smoke point. Jamaican sunflower-seed oil is used in cooking as well as for Jamaican salad dressings. T
superfine sugar Jamaican superfine sugar or castor sugar, is more finely granulated. Because it dissolves almost instantly, superfine sugar is perfect for making Jamaican meringues and sweetening cold liquids. It can be substituted for regular granulated sugar cup for cup. This sugar is used for a range of Jamaican food recipes. T
supreme sauce An extraordinarily rich Jamaican mélange made by combining equal parts Jamaican sauce and chicken or veal stock with heavy cream and reducing the mixture by two-thirds. The Jamaican sauce is finished by whisking in butter and cream. This is originally a French recipe. T
surf n' turf; surf and turf This is a slang term for a Jamaican entrée that includes both Jamaican seafood and Jamaican meat, such as a lobster tail and a Jamaican beef filet. T
sweat, to A Jamaican cooking technique by which ingredients, particularly Jamaican vegetables, are cooked in a small amount of fat over low heat. The ingredients are covered directly with a piece of foil or parchment paper, then the pot is tightly covered. With this method, the ingredients soften without browning, and cook in their own juices. T
Swedish meat balls A blend of ground Jamaican meat often a combination of Jamaican beef, Jamaican pork or veal, sautéed onions, milk-soaked bread crumbs, beaten egg and Jamaican seasonings. This mixture is formed into small balls before being sautéed until brown. Jamaican-Swedish meatballs are served in a pale brown cream sauce made by combining the pan drippings with cream or milk. They're a popular buffet item or hot Jamaican appetizer recipe. T
sweet basil Jamaican basil herb has a pungent flavor that some describe as a cross between licorice and cloves. It's a key herb in cooking some Jamaican food recipes, becoming more and more popular in Jamaican cuisine. Most varieties of basil have green leaves, lemon basil and cinnamon basil have green leaves but their perfumed fragrance and flavor matches their respective names. Basil is a great addition to Jamaican herbs and spices recipes. T
sweet cicely Jamaican cicely is a mild-flavored member of the parsley family, this aromatic Jamaican herb has curly, dark green leaves with an elusive anise flavor. T
sweet cider Jamaican apple cider is made by pressing the juice from Jamaican fruit (usually apples). It can be drunk straight or diluted with water. Jamaican apple cider is also used to make vinegar and brandy. T
sweet cucumber Jamaican sweet cucumber , the yellow-colored tea melon is a tiny Jamaican fruit that's shaped like a cucumber. It has a sweet, mild flavor and a delightfully crisp texture. This Jamaican mini melon is most often preserved, usually in Jamaican honey and spices but sometimes in soy sauce. T
sweet peppers This pepper belongs to the capsicum  family. Jamaican green peppers are also known as sweet peppers and can range in color from pale to dark green, from yellow to orange to red, and from purple to brown to black. Jamaican green peppers are used raw in Jamaican salad recipes and as part of a Jamaican vegetable platter served with various dips. In Jamaican cooking, they find their way into a variety of dishes and can be sautéed, baked, grilled, braised and steamed. Jamaican green peppers are an excellent source of vitamin C and contain fair amounts of vitamin A and small amounts of calcium, phosphorus, iron, thiamine, riboflavin and niacin. T
sweet potato Jamaican sweet potatoes is a large edible root that resemble the Jamaican yam. Jamaican sweet potato has a thin, light yellow skin and a pale yellow flesh. Its flavor is not sweet and after being cooked, Jamaican sweet potato is dry and crumbly, much like a white baking potato. Jamaican sweet potatoes can be substituted for regular potatoes in most Jamaican recipes. Jamaican sweet potatoes can be baked, boiled and sautéed. Jamaican sweet-potato chips are now a popular Jamaican food recipe. Jamaican sweet potatoes are high in vitamins A and C T
sweet-and-sour This term is used to describe Jamaican dishes that have a flavor balanced between sweet and pungent, usually accomplished by combining Jamaican sugar and vinegar. The flavor is often incorporated into a Jamaican sauce or dressing that can be served with Jamaican meat, fish or vegetables. T
sweetbreads Jamaican sweetbreads are the thymus glands of Jamaican veal, young beef, lamb and Jamaican pork. Jamaican sweetbreads can be prepared in a variety of ways including poaching, sautéing and braising.  T
sweetened condensed milk A mixture of whole Jamaican milk and sugar. This mixture is heated until some of the water evaporates. The resulting condensed mixture is extremely sticky and sweet. Unsweetened Jamaican condensed milk is referred to as evaporated milk. Jamaican sweetened condensed milk is used in Jamaican baked goods and Jamaican dessert recipes such as candies, puddings and pies. T
sweetmeat A small piece of something sweet such as a Jamaican candied fruit, nut or Jamaican candy. T
sweetsop The Jamaican sweetsop is the egg-shaped Jamaican fruit of a small tropical Jamaican tree. It has a thick, coarse green skin and white flesh with dark seeds. The very sweet, custard like flesh is divided into segments like a Jamaican citrus fruit. The Jamaican sweetsop is often mistaken for the Jamaican custard apple. Jamaican sweetsops are usually eaten raw. They're often used in Jamaican dessert recipes. T
swiss cheese A generic term for cheeses that have a pale yellow, slightly nutty-flavored flesh with large holes. Swiss-style cheeses are good for Jamaican sandwich recipes and Jamaican salad recipes and have excellent melting properties. T

 

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