Submit A Site | Advertise | About Us  

Jamaican Food Glossary:

ALPHABETICAL SEARCH
Q - R
search other categories
A - B C D -  E - F G - H - I J - K - L - M N - O - P S T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

TRY QUICK SEARCH

 

Q  
quick bread Jamaican bread that is quick to make because it doesn't require kneading or rising time. That's because the leavener in such a bread is usually baking powder or baking soda, which, when combined with moisture, starts the rising process immediately. In the case of double-acting baking powder, oven heat causes a second burst of rising power. Jamaican Eggs can also be used to leaven quick breads. This genre includes most Jamaican biscuits, Jamaican muffin, Jamaican popover recipes and a wide variety of sweet and savory Jamaican loaf breads and other Jamaican food recipes. T
quince The quince tree is used for everything from perfume to honey. It was also considered a symbol of love and given to one's intended as a sign of commitment. The quince fruit is not a popular fruit in Jamaican and is usually imported. This yellow-skinned fruit looks and tastes like a cross between an apple and a pear. The hard, yellowish-white flesh is quite dry and has an astringent, tart flavor. Its texture and flavor make it better cooked than raw, and because of its high pectin content it's particularly popular for use in jams, jellies and preserves. Peel before using in Jamaican jam recipes, Jamaican preserves recipes, Jamaican dessert recipes and savory dishes. T
quinine water Also called quinine water , tonic is water charged with carbon dioxide and flavored with Jamaican fruit extracts, sugar and usually a tiny amount of quinne (a bitter alkaloid). It's especially popular as a mixer, such as with gin to create the gin and tonic Jamaican cocktail. The tonic is not a popular Jamaican drink recipe. T
R  
radish The Jamaican radish is in fact the root of a plant in the mustard family. Its skin can vary in color from white to red to purple to black (and many shades in between). In shape and size, the radish can be round, oval or elongated and can run the gamut from globes 1/2 inch in diameter to carrot like giants. Jamaican radishes are most often used raw in Jamaican salad recipes, as garnishes and can be cooked. Radish sprouts can be used as a peppery accent to salads and as a garnish for a variety of cold and hot Jamaican dishes. T
raisin A raisin is simply a dried grape. Grapes are either sun-dried or dehydrated mechanically. Raisins imported in Jamaica and can be eaten out of hand, as well as used in a variety of Jamaican baked goods and in cooked and raw Jamaican dishes. They have a high natural sugar content, contain a variety of vitamins and minerals and are especially rich in iron. T
ramen Thee are instant-style deep-fried noodles that are sold in cellophane packages, sometimes with bits of dehydrated vegetables and broth mix. This is also a Jamaican recipe that had been adopted from the Japanese that is a broth of noodles with escallions and cuts of Jamaican meat and Jamaican chicken. T
ramp This is a Jamaican wild onion that resembles a scallion with broad leaves. The onion has an assertive, garlicky-onion flavor. The flavor of the onion is slightly stronger than the common Jamaican onion and it can be used raw or cooked in many Jamaican dishes. T
raw milk Raw milk is milk that has not been pasteurized. This milk is not very popular in Jamaica as it will carry many diseases because of its raw state. T
raw sugar Jamaican raw sugar should not be substituted for regular brown sugar in Jamaican recipes. Though similar in color, brown sugar should not be confused with raw sugar, the residue left after Jamaican sugarcane has been processed to remove the molasses and refine the sugar crystals. Jamaican raw sugar can be found on many Jamaican sugar plantations that produce sugar and Jamaican rum. T
reamer A manual or electric kitchen device used to extract the juice from Jamaican fruit, and with some models, Jamaican vegetables. Most of those used strictly for juicing citrus fruits have a ridged cone onto which a halved fruit is pressed. A reamer is used primarily for citrus Jamaican fruits. T
reconstitute Culinary, the term means to return a dehydrated Jamaican food (such as dried milk) to its original consistency by adding a liquid, usually water. T
red beans This is a dark red, medium-size Jamaican bean. Jamaican red beans are available dried in most supermarkets. T
red beans and rice This Jamaican dish combines red kidney beans, ham, onions and Jamaican seasonings. This dish is slowly simmered until tender and flavorful. The beans, which create a thick natural gravy, are served with bits of ham over white rice. This is also a popular recipe in the USA. T
red bell pepper This Jamaican sweet peppers is so-named for its rather bell-like shape. They have a mild, sweet flavor and crisp, exceedingly juicy flesh. When young, the majority of bell peppers are a rich, bright green, but there are also yellow, orange, purple, red and brown bell peppers. The red bells are simply vine-ripened green bell peppers that, because they've ripened longer, are very sweet. These sweet peppers are used for a wide range of Jamaican food recipes. T
red cabbage The Jamaican red cabbage comes in compact heads of waxy, tightly wrapped leaves that range in color from almost white to green to red. Jamaican red cabbage can be cooked in a variety of ways or eaten raw, as in Jamaican Cole slaw. This Jamaican vegetable, contains a good amount of vitamin C and some vitamin A T
red cooking A Jamaican-Chinese cooking method whereby Jamaican food (such as chicken) is browned in Jamaican made soy sauce, thereby changing the color to a deep, dark red. T
red peas soup This is a popular Jamaican soup recipe that uses red kidney peas with stewed Jamaican meats to make a red soup recipe. T
red pepper; red pepper flakes A generic term applied to any of several varieties of hot, red Jamaican peppers. The most commonly available forms are ground red pepper and red pepper flakes, these are commonly used in preparing Jamaican food recipes. T
red snapper Jamaican species of snapper include the gray snapper, mutton snapper, schoolmaster snapper and yellowtail snapper. By far the best known and most popular, however, is the red snapper, so named because of its reddish-pink skin and red eyes. Its flesh is firm textured and contains very little fat. Jamaican snapper is the most popular fish used in the preparation of Jamaican fish recipes either by Escoveitched or steaming. T
reduce Culinary, to boil a liquid (usually stock, wine or a Jamaican sauce mixture) rapidly until the volume is reduced by evaporation, thereby thickening the consistency and intensifying the flavor. Such a mixture is sometimes referred to as a reduction, this practice is commonly used by Jamaican cooks and chefs when preparing Jamaican food recipes. T
refrigerator cookie Also called Jamaican icebox cookie , this style of cookie is made by forming the dough into a log, wrapping in plastic wrap or waxed paper and chilling until firm. The dough is then sliced into rounds and baked. This is a popular Jamaican cookie recipe. T
refrigerator thermometer A common kitchen tool in Jamaica that registers temperatures from about -20° to 80°F. This thermometer is important because frozen Jamaican food that's not maintained at 0°F or below will begin to deteriorate, thereby losing both quality and nutrients. Likewise, fresh Jamaican food risks potential spoilage if refrigerated at a temperature higher than 40°F. A freezer/refrigerator thermometer should be positioned near the top and front of the freezer and left there for at least 6 hours before the temperature is checked. If the thermometer's temperature doesn't read 0°F or below, adjust the freezer's temperature regulator and check in another 6 hours. Refrigerator temperature may be checked in the same way. This tool is used by many Jamaican cooks and chefs. T
render To melt animal fat over low heat so that it separates from any connective pieces of tissue, which, during rendering, turn brown and crisp and are generally referred to as cracklings. The resulting clear fat is then strained through a paper filter to remove any dark particles. This is a common practice by Jamaican chefs when preparing Jamaican food recipes.  T
rennin This is a coagulating enzyme obtained from a young animal's (usually a calf's) stomach, rennin is used to curdle milk in Jamaican foods such as cheese. This is not commonly used by Jamaican cooks when preparing Jamaican food recipes. T
restaurateur A Jamaican restaurant owner or manager. A popular misconception is that the word is pronounced the same as "restaurant," whereas in actuality, there is no "n" in restaurateur. T
rhubarb The thick, Jamaican celery like stalks of this buckwheat-family member can reach up to 2 feet long. They're the only edible portion of the plant the leaves contain oxalic acid and can therefore be toxic. Though rhubarb is generally eaten as a fruit, it's botanically a Jamaican vegetable. It makes delicious Jamaican sauce recipes, Jamaican jam recipes and Jamaican dessert recipes and in some regions is also known as pie plant  because of its popularity for that purpose. Jamaican rhubarb contains a fair amount of vitamin A. T
rib The Jamaican meat cut (beef, lamb or veal) from between the short loin and the chuck. Jamaican chops, steaks and roasts (depending on the animal) are cut from the rib section, which is very tender. A rib is also a single stalk of a celery bunch, though some cooks refer to the entire bunch as a rib. In general, the words rib  and stalk  describe the same thing. T
rib roast A Jamaican beef roast from the rib section between the short loin and the chuck. The three most popular styles are standing Jamaican rib roast, Jamaican rolled rib roast and Jamaican rib-eye roast. The standing Jamaican rib roast usually includes at least three ribs. It's roasted standing upright, resting on its rack of ribs, thereby allowing the top layer of fat to melt and self-baste the meat. A Jamaican rolled rib roast has had the bones removed before being rolled and tied into a cylinder. Removing the bones also slightly diminishes the flavor of this roast. The boneless rib-eye roast is the center, most desirable and tender portion of the rib section. T
rib steak This tender, flavorful Jamaican beef steak is a boneless cut from the rib section. If the bones are removed the result is the extremely tender rib-eye steak . Both should be quickly cooked by grilling, broiling or frying. T
ribbon A Jamaican cooking term describing the texture of an egg-and-sugar mixture that has been beaten until pale and extremely thick. When the beater or whisk is lifted, the batter falls slowly back onto the surface of the mixture, forming a ribbon like pattern that, after a few seconds, sinks back into the batter. This is a popular Jamaican cooking method when preparing Jamaican food recipes T
rib-eye steak This tender, flavorful Jamaican beef steak is a boneless cut from the rib section. If the bones are removed the result is the extremely tender rib-eye steak . Both should be quickly cooked by grilling, broiling or frying. T
rice Jamaican grown rice is not aquatic rice  which is rice (paddy-grown) is cultivated in flooded fields. The Jamaican rice is lower-yielding, lower-quality hill-grown rice  can be grown on almost any tropical or subtropical terrain. Jamaican rice is as grain. Jamaican rice is the most popular side dish in Jamaican food recipes. Jamaican rice is cholesterol and gluten-free, is low in sodium, contains only a trace of fat and is an excellent source of complex carbohydrates. Enriched or converted rice contains calcium, iron and many B-complex vitamins, with brown rice being slightly richer in all the nutrients. T
rice and peas This is a Jamaican rice and peas recipe that uses white rice and red kidney beans. Jamaican coconut milk is also added to the recipe to give the recipe the brown color. The Jamaican recipe is most frequently prepared on Sundays. T
rice bran Jamaican rice bran, the grain's outer layer, is high in soluble fiber and research indicates that, like oat bran, it's effective in lowering cholesterol. T
rice flour Jamaican rice flour is a fine, powdery flour made from regular white rice. It's used mainly for Jamaican baked goods. Glutinous or sweet rice flour is made from high-starch short-grain rice. It's used in Jamaican cooking to thicken Jamaican sauce recipes and for some Jamaican dessert recipes. T
rice paper An edible, translucent Jamaican paper made from a dough of water combined with the pith of an Asian shrub called, appropriately enough, the rice-paper plant (or rice-paper tree). Jamaican rice flour is sometimes also used. Jamaican rice paper can be used to wrap foods to be eaten as is or deep-fried. It's also useful as a baking-sheet liner on which delicate cookies are baked. After baking, the cookies may be removed from the sheet without damage and the flavorless rice paper (which sticks to the cookies' bottoms) eaten along with the confection. Rice paper can be found in Jamaican markets. T
rice sticks These extremely thin Jamaican-Chinese noodles resemble long, translucent white hairs. When deep-fried, they explode dramatically into a tangle of airy, crunchy strands that are a traditional ingredient in Jamaican chicken salad. Rice-flour noodles can also be presoaked and used in Jamaican soup recipe. The term Jamaican rice sticks  is generally applied to rice-flour noodles that are about 1/4-inch wide. Rice sticks are not very popular in traditional Jamaican food recipes. T
rice vinegar Jamaican rice vinegar is made from fermented rice and is slightly milder than ordinary vinegars. Jamaican rice vinegar is used mainly in Jamaican sweet and sour dishes, for Jamaican boiled or steamed crab recipes and as a table condiment. The almost colorless Jamaican rice vinegar is used in a variety of Jamaican food recipes including salad recipes.  T
rice wine A sweet, golden Jamaican wine made from fermenting freshly steamed glutinous rice. Most Jamaican rice wines are low in alcohol. Jamaican rice wine is not very popular in traditional Jamaican food recipes. T
rice-flour noodles These extremely thin Jamaican-Chinese noodles resemble long, translucent white hairs. When deep-fried, they explode dramatically into a tangle of airy, crunchy strands that are a traditional ingredient in Jamaican chicken salad. Rice-flour noodles can also be presoaked and used in Jamaican soup recipe. The term Jamaican rice sticks  is generally applied to rice-flour noodles that are about 1/4-inch wide. Rice sticks are not very popular in traditional Jamaican food recipes. T
ricer Also called a Jamaican potato ricer, this kitchen utensil resembles a large garlic press. Cooked Jamaican food such as potatoes, carrots or turnips is placed in the container. A lever-operated plunger is pushed down into the Jamaican food, forcing it out through numerous tiny holes in the bottom of the container. The result is Jamaican food that (vaguely) resembles grains of rice. Jamaican ricers come in a variety of shapes, the most common being a 3- to 4-inch round basket or a V-shaped bucket. They're generally made of chromed steel or cast aluminum and can be found in specialty cookware shops. T
roast A piece of Jamaican meat such as a Jamaican rib roast that's large enough to serve more than one person. Such a Jamaican meat cut is usually cooked by the roasting method. It also refers to a Jamaican cooking method to oven cook Jamaican food in an uncovered pan, a method that usually produces a well-browned exterior and ideally a moist interior. Roasting requires reasonably tender pieces of Jamaican meat or poultry. Tougher pieces of meat need moist cooking methods such as braising. T
roasting rack A slightly raised rack usually made of stainless steel that elevates meat above the pan in which it's roasting. This prevents the Jamaican meat from cooking in any drippings and allows adequate air circulation for even cooking and browning. Roasting racks can be flat, V-shaped or adjustable so they can be used either way. T
rock bun Also called Jamaican rock cake, this spicy cross between a Jamaican cookie and a small Jamaican cake is full of coarsely chopped dried Jamaican fruit. It's baked in small mounds, which, after baking, take on a rocklike appearance. T
rock candy A simple hard Jamaican candy made by allowing a concentrated sugar syrup to evaporate slowly, during which time it crystallizes into chunks. The crystals can be formed around strings or small sticks. Small Jamaican rock-candy crystals can be used as a fancy sweetener for Jamaican tea or Jamaican coffee. Jamaican rock and rye liqueur has a large chunk of rock candy in the bottom of the bottle. T
rock salt Jamaican rock salt has a grayish cast because it's not as refined as other salts, which means it retains more minerals and harmless impurities. It comes in chunky crystals and is used predominantly as a bed on which to serve Jamaican baked oysters and clams and to combine with ice to make Jamaican ice cream in crank-style ice-cream makers. T
rock sugar Jamaican rock sugar are not as sweet as regular granulated sugar, Jamaican rock sugar comes in the form of amber-colored crystals, the result of sugar cooked until it begins to color. It's used to sweeten certain Jamaican teas and Jamaican meat glazes. T
rocky road This bumpy-textured Jamaican candy that's a mixture of miniature marshmallows, nuts and sometimes small chunks of dark, white or milk chocolate. The Jamaican candy is so named because it resembles a "rocky road" in appearance. This favorite flavor combination is also used for a number of Jamaican dessert recipes from Jamaican ice cream to Jamaican pie recipes. T
roe Jamaican roe is either hard roe and soft roe, Jamaican hard roe is female fish eggs, while Jamaican soft roe is the milt of male fish. The eggs of some crustaceans are referred to as coral. Jamaican roe can be sautéed, poached or, providing it's medium-size or larger, broiled. It can also be used in Jamaican sauce recipes. T
roll out A baking term that describes the technique of using a rolling pin to flatten a dough (such as for a Jamaican pie crust or Jamaican cookies) into a thin, even layer. T
rolled cookie A Jamaican cookie that begins by rolling a rather firm dough into an even, thick to thin layer. A Jamaican cookie cutter is then used to cut the rolled-out dough into various shapes before baking. T
rolled roast The Jamaican meat cut (beef, lamb or veal) from between the short loin and the chuck. Jamaican chops, steaks and roasts (depending on the animal) are cut from the rib section, which is very tender. A rib is also a single stalk of a celery bunch, though some cooks refer to the entire bunch as a rib. In general, the words rib  and stalk  describe the same thing. T
rolling boil This is to bring to a boil by heating a liquid until bubbles break the surface (212°F for water at sea level). The term also means to cook Jamaican food in a boiling liquid. A full rolling boil is one that cannot be dissipated by stirring the liquid, this is commonly used when preparing Jamaican shellfish recipes such as lobster and crabs. T
rolling cookie cutter A metal or plastic device used to cut decorative shapes out of dough that has been rolled flat. Cookie cutters are available singly or in sets. Dipping a cookie cutter into flour or granulated sugar will prevent it from sticking to soft doughs. A rolling cookie cutter has a wooden handle at the end of which is a metal or plastic cylinder marked with raised designs. When the cutter is rolled across the dough, it cuts a jigsaw-puzzle pattern of differently shaped Jamaican cookies without any wasted dough. T
rolling pin Though this kitchen tool is used mainly to roll out dough, it's also handy for a number of other culinary tasks including crushing crackers and bread crumbs, shaping Jamaican cookies and flattening Jamaican meats such as Jamaican chicken breasts. Many professional Jamaican cooks prefer the straight rolling pin because they get the "feel" of the dough under their palms.  T
root beer Jamaican root beer is a low-alcohol, naturally effervescent Jamaican beverage made by fermenting a blend of sugar and yeast with various roots, Jamaican herbs and barks such as sarsaparilla, sassafras, Jamaican cherry and Jamaican ginger. Jamaican does not commercially manufacture root beers. T
rose hip Jamaican rose hip cannot be eaten raw, the ripe reddish-orange fruit of the rose is often used to make Jamaican jellies and Jamaican jams, syrup, tea and even Jamaican wine. Because they're an excellent source of vitamin C, rose hips are also dried and ground into powder and sometimes compressed into tablets and sold in health-food stores in Jamaica. T
rose water A distillation of rose petals that has the intensely perfumed flavor and fragrance of its source. Jamaican rose water is a popular flavoring for Jamaican cuisine. In addition to Jamaican culinary uses, rose water is also used in religious ceremonies and as a fragrance in some cosmetics in some parts of Jamaica. T
rosemary Jamaican rosemary is a mint-family member used to cure ailments of the nervous system. Jamaica's rosemary's silver-green, needle-shaped leaves are highly aromatic and their flavor hints of both lemon and pine. This Jamaican herb is available in whole-leaf form (fresh and dried) as well as powdered. Jamaican rosemary essence is used both to flavor Jamaican food and to scent cosmetics. Jamaican rosemary can be used as a seasoning in a variety of dishes including Jamaican fruit salads, Jamaican soup recipes, Jamaican vegetables, Jamaican meat (particularly lamb), Jamaican fish recipes and Jamaican egg dishes, stuffing's and Jamaican dressings. T
rotary beater A hand-powered kitchen utensil with two beaters connected to a gear-driven wheel with a handle all of which is attached to a housing topped with a handle-grip. The rotary beater requires two hands to operate one to hold the unit, the other to turn the wheel. As the gear-driven wheel is turned, the two beaters rotate, providing aeration that can whip cream, eggs and batters. The best rotary beaters have rounded, stainless-steel hoops and nylon gears. Others are made of cast aluminum, chromed steel or plastic. T
roti An unleavened griddle-baked bread originally brought to Jamaica by Indian laborers, usually made with whole wheat flour. The roti is finished over an open flame for 10 to 15 seconds, a technique that causes it to fill with steam and puff up like a balloon. This is a popular Jamaican side dish served with Jamaican curried goat recipe. T
rotisserie A unit that cooks Jamaican food while it slowly rotates. A rotisserie contains a spit fitted with a pair of prongs that slide along its length. Jamaican food (usually Jamaican meat) is impaled on the spit and the prongs (which are inserted on each side of the Jamaican food) are screwed tightly into place to hold the Jamaican food securely. This type of cooking allows heat to circulate evenly around the food while it self-bastes with its own juices. T
roughage Jamaican roughage is a dietary fiber is that portion of plant-related Jamaican foods (such as Jamaican fruits, legumes, Jamaican vegetables and whole grains) that cannot be completely digested. High-fiber Jamaican diets reduce cholesterol levels and cancer rates. T
round, beef The hind leg of beef extends from the rump to the ankle. Jamaican round is less tender than some cuts. There are six major sections into which the Jamaican round can be divided: the rump; the four main muscles (top round, sirloin tip, bottom round and eye of round); and the heel. The rump is a triangular cut taken from the upper part of the round. This flavorful section is generally cut into Jamaican rump steaks or two or three roasts that, when boned and rolled, are referred to as rump roasts.  Those with the bone in are called standing rump roasts. Pieces from the rump section are best cooked by moist-heat methods. The top round, which lies on the inside of the leg, is the most tender of the four muscles in the round. Thick top-round cuts are often called butterball steak  or London broil , whereas thin cuts are referred to simply as top round steak . The boneless sirloin tip is also called top sirloin, triangle  and loin tip . The better grades can be oven-roasted; otherwise moist-heat methods should be used. The bottom round can vary greatly in tenderness from one end of the cut to the other. It's usually cut into Jamaican steaks (which are often cubed) or the bottom round roast . The well-flavored eye of the round is the least tender muscle, although many mistakenly think otherwise because it looks like the tenderloin. Both Jamaican steaks and roasts from this cut require slow, moist-heat cooking. A cut that includes all four of these muscles is usually called round steak  and those cut from the top (and which are of the best grades) can be cooked with dry heat. Near the bottom of the round is the toughest cut, the heel of the round. It's generally used for Jamaican ground meat but can sometimes be found as a roast. T
royal icing A Jamaican icing made of confectioners' sugar, egg whites and a few drops of lemon juice. It hardens when dry, making it a favorite for durable decorations (such as flowers and leaves) and ornamental writing. Jamaican royal icing is often tinted with food coloring. This is placed on most Jamaican cake recipes. T
rubber spatula A flattish, rather narrow kitchen utensil that comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. Depending on the material from which it's made (which includes wood, metal, rubber and plastic), spatulas can be used for a plethora of kitchen tasks. Rigid wood spatulas are good for scraping the sides of pots and turning Jamaican foods, whereas softer plastic or rubber spatulas are better for stirring ingredients in a curved bowl and folding mixtures together. Flexible metal spatulas both long and short are perfect for spreading frosting on Jamaican cake recipes. T
rum A popular Jamaican liquor distilled from fermented Jamaican sugarcane juice or Jamaican molasses. This slightly sweet liquor is used in a variety of cocktails including the pina colada. Jamaican rum is the most popular rum in the Caribbean.  T
rump roast; rump steak The hind leg of beef extends from the rump to the ankle. Jamaican round is less tender than some cuts. There are six major sections into which the Jamaican round can be divided: the rump; the four main muscles (top round, sirloin tip, bottom round and eye of round); and the heel. The rump is a triangular cut taken from the upper part of the round. This flavorful section is generally cut into Jamaican rump steaks or two or three roasts that, when boned and rolled, are referred to as rump roasts.  Those with the bone in are called standing rump roasts. Pieces from the rump section are best cooked by moist-heat methods. The top round, which lies on the inside of the leg, is the most tender of the four muscles in the round. Thick top-round cuts are often called butterball steak  or London broil , whereas thin cuts are referred to simply as top round steak . The boneless sirloin tip is also called top sirloin, triangle  and loin tip . The better grades can be oven-roasted; otherwise moist-heat methods should be used. The bottom round can vary greatly in tenderness from one end of the cut to the other. It's usually cut into Jamaican steaks (which are often cubed) or the bottom round roast . The well-flavored eye of the round is the least tender muscle, although many mistakenly think otherwise because it looks like the tenderloin. Both Jamaican steaks and roasts from this cut require slow, moist-heat cooking. A cut that includes all four of these muscles is usually called round steak  and those cut from the top (and which are of the best grades) can be cooked with dry heat. Near the bottom of the round is the toughest cut, the heel of the round. It's generally used for Jamaican ground meat but can sometimes be found as a roast. T
rundown (mackerel) This is a popular Jamaican recipe that combines Jamaican mackerel and Jamaican coconut milk to make a mush that is seasoned with Jamaican herbs and spices. The Jamaican mackerel rundown recipe is usually served with boiled Jamaican green bananas and boiled dumplings. T
rusk A Jamaican rusk is a slice of Jamaican yeast bread (thick or thin) that is baked until dry, crisp and golden brown. Some Jamaican breads used for this purpose are slightly sweetened. Jamaican rusks can be plain or flavored. T
rusty nail A Jamaican cocktail drink recipe made with equal parts of Jamaican scotch and Jamaican rum and served over ice. T
rye flour Jamaican rye flour contains less gluten (protein) than all-purpose or whole-wheat flour. A well-risen loaf of Jamaican bread without the addition of some higher-protein flour. Jamaican rye flour is also heavier and darker in color than most other flours, which is why it produces dark, dense loaves. There are several types of rye flour, the most common of which is medium rye flour. Light or dark rye flours, as well as pumpernickel flour (which is dark and coarsely ground) are available in health-food stores. T

 

Download Jamaican Cooking Made Easy Third Edition

Get Jamaican Food

Get Jamaican Recipes