Jamaican Custard Apple Is A Unique Jamaican Fruit.
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Jamaican Custard Apple

Using The Jamaican Custard Apple In Jamaica Food Recipes

Jamaican custard apple trees are large and spreading, shaded by large, green drooping Jamaican custard apple leaves. The Jamaican custard apple tree sets many light yellow trumpet shaped Jamaican custard apple flowers that emit a pungent, sweet smell especially in the late afternoon when the male pollen sacks burst open. Of these Jamaican custard apple flowers, only a small number will set Jamaican custard apple fruit. The Jamaican custard apple fruit takes between 20 and 25 weeks to reach maturity in sub-tropical climates where the days are not too warm and the nights not too cool. There are two main varieties of Jamaican custard apples, the Pinks Mammoth (or Hillary White) and the African Pride. Both are sweet, juicy and full of flavor.

Both in Jamaican custard apple tree and in Jamaican custard apple fruit, the Jamaican custard apple, Annona reticulata L., is generally rated as the mediocre or "ugly duckling" species among the prominent members of this genus. Its descriptive English name has been widely misapplied to other species and to the hybrid ATEMOYA, and the Jamaican custard apple is sometimes erroneously termed "sugar apple", "sweetsop" and, by Spanish-speaking people, "anon" or "rinon", in India, "ramphal", all properly applied only to Annona squamosa. The Jamaican custard apple has, itself, acquired relatively few appropriate regional names. Most commonly employed as an alternate name in English-speaking areas is bullock's-heart or bull's-heart; in French, coeur de boeuf; Portuguese, coracao de boi; in Spanish, often merely corazon—all alluding to its form and external blush. The skin color is reflected in the Bolivian name, chirimoya roia, the Salvadoran anona rosada, and the Guatemalan anona roja or anona colorada.

The Jamaican custard apple tree is not especially attractive. The Jamaican custard apple is erect, with a rounded or spreading crown and trunk 10 to 14 in (25-35 cm) thick. Height ranges from 15 to 35 ft (4.5-10 m). The ill-smelling Jamaican custard apple leaves are deciduous, alternate, oblong or narrow-lanceolate, 4 to 8 in (10-20 cm) long, 3/4 to 2 in (2 5 cm) wide, with conspicuous veins. Jamaican custard apple flowers, in drooping clusters, are fragrant, slender, with 3 outer fleshy, narrow petals 3/4 to 1 1/4 in (2 3 cm) long; light-green externally and pale-yellow with a dark-red or purple spot on the inside at the base.

The Jamaican custard apple flowers never fully open. The compound Jamaican custard apple fruit, 3 l/4 to 6 1/2 in (8-16 cm) in diameter may be symmetrically heart-shaped, lopsided, or irregular; or nearly round, or oblate, with a deep or shallow depression at the base. The skin, thin but tough, may be yellow or brownish when ripe, with a pink, reddish or brownish-red blush, and faintly, moderately, or distinctly reticulated. There is a thick, cream-white layer of custard like, somewhat granular, flesh beneath the skin surrounding the concolorous moderately juicy segments, in many of which there is a single, hard, dark-brown or black, glossy Jamaican custard apple seed, oblong, smooth, less than 1/2 in (1.25 cm) long. Actual Jamaican custard apple seed counts have been 55, 60 and 76. A pointed, fibrous, central core, attached to the thick stem, extends more than halfway through the Jamaican custard apple fruit. The flavor is sweet and agreeable though without the distinct character of the Jamaican custard apple, sugar apple, or atemoya.

The Jamaican custard apple, native to tropical America, is a deciduous Jamaican custard apple tree 20 to 25 feet in height. The oblong to lanceolate Jamaican custard apple leaves are up to 10 inches in length and are pubescent when young but smooth when mature. This Jamaican custard apple fruit is often confused with the Pond Apple, Annona glabra L., because of the similarity in Jamaican custard apple fruit shape (fig. 9). The orange-colored pulp of the pond apple is inedible, but the Jamaican custard apple plant does have promise as a Jamaican custard apple rootstock for other annonas because of its tolerance to flooded conditions.

The Jamaican custard apple is a fairly dense, fast-growing, evergreen Jamaican custard apple tree, briefly deciduous in California from February through April. The Jamaican custard apple tree can reach 30 feet or more, but is fairly easily restrained. Young Jamaican custard apple trees "harp," forming opposite branches as a natural espalier. These can be trained against a surface, or pruned off to form a regular free-standing trunk. Growth is in one long flush, beginning in April. The Jamaican custard apple roots commence as tap Jamaican custard apple root, but the slow-growing Jamaican custard apple root system is rather weak, superficial, and unready.

Young Jamaican custard apple plants need staking. The attractive Jamaican custard apple leaves are single and alternate, 2 to 8 inches long and up to 4 inches wide. They are dark green on top and velvety green on the bottom, with prominent veins. New growth is re-curved, like a fiddle-neck. Auxiliary buds are hidden beneath fleshy Jamaican custard apple leaf petioles.

The fragrant Jamaican custard apple flowers are borne solitary or in groups of 2 or 3 on short, hairy stalks along the branches. They appear with new growth flushes, continuing as new growth proceeds and on old wood until midsummer. The Jamaican custard apple flowers are made up of three fleshy, greenish-brown, oblong, downy outer petals and three smaller, pinkish inner petals. They are perfect but dichogamous, lasting approximately two days, and opening in two stages, first as female Jamaican custard apple flowers for approximately 36 hours and later as male Jamaican custard apple flowers. The Jamaican custard apple flower has a declining receptivity to pollen during the female stage and is unlikely to be pollinated by its own pollen in the male stage

The compound Jamaican custard apple fruit is conical or somewhat heart-shaped, 4 to 8 inches long and up to 4 inches in width, weighing on the average 5-1/2 to 18 ounces, but the largest Jamaican custard apple fruits may reach 5 pounds in weight. The skin, thin or thick, may be smooth with fingerprint-like markings or covered with conical or rounded protuberances. The sweet, juicy, white flesh is melting, sub acid and very fragrant. The Jamaican custard apple fruit is of a primitive form with spirally arranged carpals, resembling a raspberry. Each segment of flesh surrounds a single hard black bean-like Jamaican custard apple seed. The Jamaican custard apple fruit size is generally proportional to the number of Jamaican custard apple seeds within. They ripen October to May.

Jamaican custard apples prefer a sunny exposure, buoyant marine air and cool nights. In southern California do not plant the Jamaican custard apple where heat collects on barren hillside or against a wall, since the Jamaican custard apple leaves and Jamaican custard apple fruit may sunburn badly. In the north, do the opposite: Jamaican custard apple plant against a south facing wall to collect heat and encourage early bud-break and Jamaican custard apple fruit ripening. The Jamaican custard apple trees need protection from constant ocean or Santa Ana winds which may damage them and interfere with pollination and Jamaican custard apple fruit set.

The Jamaican custard apple performs well on a wide range of soil types from light to heavy, but seems to do best on a well-drained, medium soil of moderate fertility. The optimum pH ranges from 6.5 to 7.6. Jamaican custard apples need plenty of moisture while they are growing actively, but should not be watered when they are dormant. The Jamaican custard apple trees are susceptible to Jamaican custard apple root rot in soggy soils, especially in cool weather. Commence deep watering biweekly in April. Drip irrigation is also an excellent way to supply water. The Jamaican custard apple is best to avoid poor water to prevent salt build-up. Drought-stressed Jamaican custard apple trees will drop their Jamaican custard apple leaves, exposing the Jamaican custard apple fruit to sunburn.

Jamaican custard apples should be fertilized on a regular basis. Apply a balanced fertilizer, such as 8-8-8 NPK, in midwinter, then every three months. Increase the amount of fertilizer each year until the Jamaican custard apple trees begin to bear Jamaican custard apple fruit. Mature Jamaican custard apple trees require an annual application of 4 ounces of actual nitrogen per inch of trunk diameter. Jamaican custard apples also respond to organic amendments. The Jamaican custard apple should be kept in mind that yellow Jamaican custard apple leaves may mean that the soil too dry or the weather too cold, not always a need for fertilizer.

Jamaican custard apples have rather brittle wood. Prune during the dormant period to develop strong branches that can support the heavy Jamaican custard apple fruit. Train the Jamaican custard apple tree to two scaffold branches at 2 feet of trunk, pruning them to a 2 foot length. Save only the strongest single shoots, preferably those at 60 to 90 degree angle, and remove the others. In the following years, remove two-thirds of the previous year's growth, leaving six or seven good buds, at time of new growth. This will keep Jamaican custard apple fruiting wood within reach of the ground. Thin out crossing branches.

Young Jamaican custard apple trees are very frost sensitive. Wrap the trunk and scaffold with sponge foam for protection, or cover the entire Jamaican custard apple tree. In cooler areas Jamaican custard apple plant next to a south-facing wall or under the eaves to trap house heat. Since natural pollinators are not present in California, the Jamaican custard apple flowers must be pollinated by hand. This is best done in mid-season of bloom, over a period of two to three months. In early evening, collect in a small bottle the anthers and pollen from the interior of fully open male Jamaican custard apple flowers with a number 2 or number 3 artists brush. Anthers will be tan colored and the white pollen falling from them will be obvious. The pollen has its highest viability at the time the Jamaican custard apple is shed and declines significantly with time.

Immediately apply freshly collected pollen with a small brush to the Jamaican custard apple flowers in partially open, female stage. If no female stage Jamaican custard apple flowers are available, pollen may be saved in the sealed container under refrigeration overnight. Pollen may then be applied to female stage Jamaican custard apple flowers in the morning. In large scale operations the pollen may be mixed with inert Lycopodium spores, PVC, starch or talc powder and applied with aspirator-type Japanese apple-pollinators, to save time and pollen. Pollinate every two or three days, and only Jamaican custard apple flowers easily reached inside the Jamaican custard apple tree, to avoid sunburned and wind-damaged Jamaican custard apple fruit. If pollination efforts are quite successful, the Jamaican custard apple may be necessary to thin the Jamaican custard apple fruit. Too much Jamaican custard apple fruit may result in small size and adversely effect future yields.

The Jamaican custard apple fruit turns a pale green or creamy yellow color as they reach maturity. Color change is not marked in cool weather. They should be picked when still firm and allowed to soften at room temperature. Ripe Jamaican custard apple fruit will give to soft pressure. Overripe Jamaican custard apple fruit will be dark brown. Jamaican custard apple fruit left on the Jamaican custard apple tree too long will usually crack or split and begin to decay. The Jamaican custard apple fruit should be clipped rather than pulled from the Jamaican custard apple tree. Cut the stem close to the Jamaican custard apple fruit so the Jamaican custard apple won't puncture other Jamaican custard apple fruit during storage.

Store mature Jamaican custard apple fruit above 55° F to prevent chilling injury to the skin and flesh. Ripe Jamaican custard apple fruit will deteriorate quickly but can be stored at temperatures lower than 55° F for short periods. Ripe Jamaican custard apples can be frozen and eaten like ice cream. Jamaican custard apples are best served chilled, cut in half or quartered and eaten with a spoon. The Jamaican custard apple fruit can also be juiced or used to make delicious sorbets or milkshakes.

Though unusual in appearance, Jamaican custard apples are readily accepted by western tastes and have become a favorite tropical Jamaican custard apple fruit. Demand greatly exceeds supply in all U.S. markets as most Jamaican custard apple fruit never Jamaican custard apple leaves California, the only producing state. The Jamaican custard apple fruit commands high wholesale and retail prices, but costs are high and major Jamaican custard apple crop losses from frost and Jamaican custard apple fruit splitting are an ever present possibility. The major labor costs are pruning, pollination, ant control and irrigation.

The Jamaican custard apple is believed to be a native of the West Indies but the Jamaican custard apple was carried in early times through Central America to southern Mexico. The Jamaican custard apple has long been cultivated and naturalized as far south as Peru and Brazil. The Jamaican custard apple is commonly grown in the Bahamas and occasionally in Bermuda and southern Florida. Apparently the Jamaican custard apple was introduced into tropical Africa early in the 17th century and the Jamaican custard apple is grown in South Africa as a dooryard Jamaican custard apple fruit Jamaican custard apple tree. In India the Jamaican custard apple tree is cultivated, especially around Calcutta, and runs wild in many areas. The Jamaican custard apple has become fairly common on the east coast of Malaya, and more or less throughout Southeast Asia and the Philippines though nowhere particularly esteemed. Eighty years ago the Jamaican custard apple was reported as thoroughly naturalized in Guam. In Hawaii the Jamaican custard apple is not well known.

The Jamaican custard apple flowers are produced in the axils of the Jamaican custard apple leaves on the new growth. The globose-ovoid Jamaican custard apple fruits are 3 to 5 inches in diameter (7-12 cm). The skin is smooth, but the surface is faintly divided into platelets showing that, botanically, the Jamaican custard apple fruit has resulted from the fusion of many carpals. The skin is brownish when ripe and may be blushed with red on one cheek. In the Caribbean, the Jamaican custard apple fruit ripens in late summer to early fall. The pulp of the Jamaican custard apple fruit is off-white and is sweet but tends to be somewhat insipid. The Jamaican custard apple is one of the poorest of the annonas with respect to quality. The Red Jamaican custard apple is a Jamaican custard apple cultivar with improved taste, although slightly less productive.

No named Jamaican custard apple cultivars are reported but there is considerable variation in the quality of Jamaican custard apple fruit from different Jamaican custard apple trees. The yellow-skinned types seem superior to the brownish, and, when well filled out, have thicker and juicier flesh. Jamaican custard apple seeds of a purple-skinned, purple-fleshed form, from Mexico, were Jamaican custard apple planted in Florida and the Jamaican custard apple tree has produced Jamaican custard apple fruit of unremarkable quality. Pinks Mammoth are large super sweet Jamaican custard apple fruit which some growers hand pollinate at Jamaican custard apple flowering to improve Jamaican custard apple fruit shape. These Jamaican custard apple trees can produce Jamaican custard apple fruit weighing as much as 3kg. African Prides are a medium sized well shaped 500g to 800g Jamaican custard apple fruit that sets well on the Jamaican custard apple tree.

Bays variety of Jamaican custard apple has a broad Jamaican custard apple tree, growing up to 20 ft. The Jamaican custard apple fruits are round, medium size, light green, skin shows fingerprint like marks. The Jamaican custard apple flavor is good and almost lemony. The Big Sister variety of Jamaican custard apple is a sibling of the Sabor. The Jamaican custard apple fruit is large, very smooth and has a good flavor. The Booth variety of Jamaican custard apple is among hardiest of Jamaican custard apple the Jamaican custard apple does well in most present growing areas. The Jamaican custard apple tree grows 20 to 30 feet high. The Jamaican custard apple fruit is conical, impressa type, medium size, rather Jamaican custard apple seedy, with flavor that suggests papaya. The Chaffey variety of Jamaican custard apple has a Jamaican custard apple tree that is rather open and fast growing. The Jamaican custard apple variety is mostly grown in the coastal areas. The Jamaican custard apple fruit small to medium, round, impressa type, with high, lemony flavor. The Ecuador variety of Jamaican custard apple has a broad Jamaican custard apple tree, with the branches limber, spreading. The Jamaican custard apple is has superior hardiness. The Jamaican custard apple fruit is medium, quite dark green and has a good flavor. The El Bumpo variety of Jamaican custard apple has a conical Jamaican custard apple fruit, medium size, not suited for commerce. The skin is soft, practically edible. The flavor is among the finest.

The Honey hart variety of Jamaican custard apple is Medium, skin smooth, plated, yellowish green. The Pulp has smooth texture, excellent flavor, very juicy. The Jamaican custard apple ripens November to March. The Knight variety of Jamaican custard apple grows mainly in Mexico. The Jamaican custard apple tree has medium vigor, medium-sized pale green wavy Jamaican custard apple leaves. Jamaican custard apple fruit has minor protuberances, a thin skin, and a slightly grainy texture and is quite sweet. The Libby variety of Jamaican custard apple has a large and the Jamaican custard apple fruit round type, round conical; early harvest. This variety of Jamaican custard apple has a sweet and strong flavor. The McPherson variety of Jamaican custard apple has a pyramidal Jamaican custard apple tree that grows up to 30 ft. The Jamaican custard apple fruit is small to medium in size, conical, dark green, impressa type, not Jamaican custard apple seedy. The flavor suggests banana, sweetness varies with temperature while maturing. The Nata variety of Jamaican custard apple has a vigorous Jamaican custard apple tree and bears quickly, Jamaican custard apple flowers profuse, tendency to self-pollinating. The Jamaican custard apple fruits is smooth, light green, conical and 1-1½ to 2½ pounds. The skin is thin and tender. The flavor has good sweet-acid balance.

The Ott variety of Jamaican custard apple has a strong growing Jamaican custard apple tree. The Jamaican custard apple fruit is medium, heart shaped tuberculate, flesh yellow, Jamaican custard apple seedy, very sweet and matures early. The Whaley variety of Jamaican custard apple has a moderately vigorous Jamaican custard apple tree. The Jamaican custard apple fruit is medium to large elongated conical, tuberculate, light green, flavor good. The Jamaican custard apple seed enclosed in an obtrusive sac of flesh. The White variety of Jamaican custard apple has an open Jamaican custard apple tree, unkempt this variety of Jamaican custard apple can grow to 35 feet and needs forming. A commercial favorite the Jamaican custard apple grows best near the coast. The Jamaican custard apple fruit is large, to 4 pounds, conical, with superficial small lumps. The flesh is juicy, the flavor weak, and tastes of mango-papaya

Both Jamaican custard apple fruit when mature turn from dark green to a light green or jade color. Hence, our brand name, Jade Jamaican custard apple fruit. Pinks Mammoth can also, when mature, show a yellowing between the Jamaican custard apple fruit carpules.

A Jamaican custard apple is ripe when you gently squeeze the Jamaican custard apple and the Jamaican custard apple gives slightly under your hand. Much the same as an avocado. You can buy Jamaican custard apples ready to eat, or still hard to the touch and let the Jamaican custard apple ripens over the next few days after purchase. If you want to hasten the ripening process then simply put the Jamaican custard apple fruit into a brown paper bag with a banana and leave the Jamaican custard apple on the kitchen bench. The banana will accelerate the ripening of the Jamaican custard apple.

Jamaican custard apples are only eaten when soft, and only the flesh is eaten. To eat, simply cut in half and scoop out the white flesh. The Jamaican custard apple should be moist with a pleasant sweet aroma. Both varieties are delicious and very nutritious, perfect for eating every day. Try giving some mashed Jamaican custard apple to toddlers or a Jamaican custard apple smoothie to the kids. A fresh and healthy alternative they will want time and time again

A sweet tooth can safely indulge in delicious Jamaican custard apple fruit as their sugar content comes accompanied by fiber and other nutrients. As Jamaican custard apple fruit is more filling than other forms of sweet foods there is less danger of over-eating. Jamaican custard apples provide sugars that give sustained energy and do not overreact the body's insulin output like processed sugars. The sugars designed by nature are complemented by other natural products such as vitamins, minerals, fiber and protein necessary for energy production.

Jamaican custard apples are a well-balanced food having protein, fiber, minerals, vitamins, energy and little fat. They are an excellent source of Vitamin C, a good source of dietary fiber, a useful source of Vitamin B6, magnesium and potassium, and with some B2 and complex carbohydrate.

The Jamaican custard apple tree needs a tropical climate but with cooler winters than those of the west coast of Malaya. The Jamaican custard apple flourishes in the coastal lowlands of Ecuador; is rare above 5,000 ft (1,500 m). In Guatemala, the Jamaican custard apple is nearly always found below 4,000 ft (1,220 m). In India, the Jamaican custard apple does well from the plains up to an elevation of 4,000 ft (1,220 m); in Ceylon, the Jamaican custard apple cannot be grown above 3,000 ft (915 m). Around Luzon in the Philippines, the Jamaican custard apple is common below 2,600 ft (800 m). The Jamaican custard apple is too tender for California and Jamaican custard apple trees introduced into Palestine succumbed to the cold. In southern Florida the Jamaican custard apple leaves are shed at the first onset of cold weather and the Jamaican custard apple tree is dormant all winter. Fully grown, the Jamaican custard apple has survived temperatures of 27º to 28ºF (-2.78º to 2.22ºC) without serious harm. This species is less drought-tolerant than the sugar apple and prefers a more humid atmosphere.

The Jamaican custard apple does best in low-lying, deep, rich soil with ample moisture and good drainage. The Jamaican custard apple grows to full size on oolitic limestone in southern Florida and runs wild in light sand and various other types of soil in the New and Old World tropics but is doubtless less productive in the less desirable sites.

Jamaican custard apple seed is the usual means of propagation. Nevertheless, the Jamaican custard apple tree can be multiplied by inarching, or by budding or grafting onto its own Jamaican custard apple seedlings or onto sour sop, sugar apple or pond apple Jamaican custard apple rootstocks. Experiments in Mexico, utilizing Jamaican custard apple, llama, sour sop, Jamaican custard apple, Annona sp. Af. lutescens and Rollinia jimenezii Schlecht. as Jamaican custard apple rootstocks showed best results when Jamaican custard apple scions were side-grafted onto self-Jamaican custard apple rootstock, sour sop, or A. sp. Af. lutescens.

Jamaican custard apple seedlings are frequently used as Jamaican custard apple rootstocks for the sour sop, sugar apple and atemoya. The Jamaican custard apple can be propagated readily from Jamaican custard apple seeds; the Jamaican custard apple seedlings begin producing Jamaican custard apple fruit when 4 to 5 years of age. The Jamaican custard apple also can be grafted or budded on Jamaican custard apple seedlings of the same species, or on those of sour sop, sweetsop, and pond apple. Jamaican custard apple trees of the Jamaican custard apple grow well on a wide range of soil types and are better adapted to the drier regions of the Tropics than are the other annonas. They cannot tolerate excessive soil moisture. Jamaican custard apples are a sub-tropical deciduous Jamaican custard apple tree belonging to the Annonaceae family. This family contains over 2000 members spread throughout the world. Of this family, the Jamaican custard apple is the atemeoya, a hybrid of the Annona genus, that Australia's commercial Jamaican custard apple cultivars derive from.

The Jamaican custard apple tree is fast-growing and responds well to mulching, organic fertilizers and to frequent irrigation if there is dry weather during the growing period. The form of the Jamaican custard apple tree may be improved by judicious pruning.

The Jamaican custard apple has the advantage of Jamaican custard apple cropping in late winter and spring when the preferred members of the genus are not in season. The Jamaican custard apple is picked when the Jamaican custard apple has lost all green color and ripens without splitting so that the Jamaican custard apple is readily sold in local markets. If picked green, the Jamaican custard apple will not color well and will be of inferior quality. The Jamaican custard apple tree is naturally a fairly heavy bearer. With adequate care, a mature Jamaican custard apple tree will produce 75 to 100 lbs (34-45 kg) of Jamaican custard apple fruits per year. The short twigs are shed after they have borne Jamaican custard apple flowers and Jamaican custard apple fruits.

Mealy bugs and snails are the main pests of Jamaican custard apples. Keep ducks or apply copper strips to the trunks for control of snails. Mealy bugs are brought by ants which can be controlled to some extent by maintaining fresh Tangle foot on masking tape around the trunk. The masking tape is important to prevent damage to the Jamaican custard apple tree. Skirt the Jamaican custard apple tree to prevent ant access from the ground or weeds. No chemicals are registered for use on Jamaican custard apples. Jamaican custard apples are susceptible to Armillaria (Oak Jamaican custard apple root Fungus) and Verticillium. Do not plant the Jamaican custard apple in old vegetable gardens, or near tomatoes, egg Jamaican custard apple plant or asters. Crown rot can kill Jamaican custard apple trees damaged by frost or growing in saturated soil, as well as from trunks hit by frequent, superficial lawn sprinkling.

The Jamaican custard apple is heavily attacked by the chalcid fly. Many if not all of the Jamaican custard apple fruits on a Jamaican custard apple tree may be mummified before maturity. In India, the ripening Jamaican custard apple fruits must be covered with bags or nets to avoid damage from Jamaican custard apple fruit bats. A dry charcoal rot was observed on the Jamaican custard apple fruits in Assam in 1947. In 1957 and 1958 the Jamaican custard apple made its appearance at Saharanpur. The causal fungus was identified as Diplodia annonae. The infection begins at the stem end of the Jamaican custard apple fruit and gradually spreads until the Jamaican custard apple covers the entire Jamaican custard apple fruit.

In India, the Jamaican custard apple fruit is eaten only by the lower classes, out-of-hand. In Central America, Mexico and the West Indies, the Jamaican custard apple fruit is appreciated by all. When fully ripe the Jamaican custard apple is soft to the touch and the stem and attached core can be easily pulled out. The flesh may be scooped from the skin and eaten as is or served with light cream and a sprinkling of sugar. Often the Jamaican custard apple is pressed through a sieve and added to milk shakes, custards or ice cream. I have made a delicious sauce for cake and puddings by blending the Jamaican custard apple seeded flesh with mashed banana and a little cream.

The Jamaican custard apple has only 80 -101 calories. With protein, fat, carbohydrates, crude fiber, ash, calcium, phosphorus, iron, carotene, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, ascorbic acid and nicotinic acid. The Jamaican custard apple seeds are so hard that they may be swallowed whole with no ill effects but the kernels are very toxic. The Jamaican custard apple seeds, Jamaican custard apple leaves and young Jamaican custard apple fruits are insecticidal. The Jamaican custard apple leaf juice kills lice. The bark contains 0.12% anonaine. Injection of an extract from the bark caused paralysis in a rear limb of an experimental toad. Sap from cut branches is acrid and irritant and can severely injure the eyes. The Jamaican custard apple root bark has yielded 3 alkaloids: anonaine, liriodenine and reticuline (muricinine).

The Jamaican custard apple leaves have been employed in tanning and they yield a blue or black dye. A fiber derived from the young twigs is superior to the bark fiber from Annona squamosa. Jamaican custard apple wood is yellow, rather soft, fibrous but durable, moderately close-grained, with a specific gravity of 0.650. The Jamaican custard apple has been used to make yokes for oxen.

The Jamaican custard apple leaf decoction is given as a vermifuge. Crushed Jamaican custard apple leaves or a paste of the flesh may be poulticed on boils, abscesses and ulcers. The unripe Jamaican custard apple fruit is rich in tannin; is dried, pulverized and employed against diarrhea and dysentery. The bark is very astringent and the decoction is taken as a tonic and also as a remedy for diarrhea and dysentery. In severe cases, the Jamaican custard apple leaves, bark and green Jamaican custard apple fruits are all boiled together for 5 minutes in a liter of water to make an exceedingly potent decoction. Fragments of the Jamaican custard apple root bark are packed around the gums to relieve toothache. The Jamaican custard apple root decoction is taken as a febrifuge

Although somewhat less esteemed than the Jamaican custard apple and atemoya, the Jamaican custard apple is well-liked in many parts of the world. In poor varieties the flesh is usually a bit less flavorful than its well-known relatives, but thankfully better varieties are spreading, having fairly good-flavored flesh. Jamaican custard apple fruits often have colorful skin with creamy, white or pale yellow flesh

Small Jamaican custard apple tree to 20-35ft. Jamaican custard apple leaves can be quite pretty but Jamaican custard apple trees often take on irregular shapes. The Jamaican custard apple tree is popular as a Jamaican custard apple rootstock for other Annona species. The Jamaican custard apple is tropical, but full -grown Jamaican custard apple trees show hardiness to 26F. Jamaican custard apples have an advantage over other Annona's in that they tend to ripen slightly later in the year than their relatives, so during certain times of the year, only Jamaican custard apples are available. Usually by Jamaican custard apple seeds. There are few named varieties, but better strains are propagated by air layering and grafting

100g of Jamaican custard apple flesh will provide over 110% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin C and as even a small Jamaican custard apple will weigh around 250grams then there is no need for supplements to obtain your vitamin C intake if eaten daily. Very little vitamin C is stored in the body so the Jamaican custard apple should be taken in every day and as the Jamaican custard apple is lost from food in cooking then fresh food is best. Vitamin C is also an anti-oxidant and as anti-oxidants help to neutralize unstable substances, known as free radicals, that can damage cells. Extra Vitamin C may be needed during 1) times of stress, 2) when fighting infection, 3) after surgery or if a wound is slow to heal, 4) if you smoke or consume moderate or large amounts of alcohol. As Jamaican custard apples are available fresh from March through to October in Australia (and all grown here) then the Jamaican custard apple is easy to have some for most of the year.

Magnesium is essential for all the body's major processes and 100g of Jamaican custard apple flesh supplies almost 10% of your daily needs. Magnesium has a major role in enabling muscles to relax and as such may be the most important nutrient to protect against heart disease, so eating food rich is magnesium seems a very healthy thing to do. The Jamaican custard apple also has a mild tranquillizing action. As Calcium is a natural tranquillizer then a perfect night time drink to help you sleep well would be Jamaican custard apple egg nog.

Jamaican custard apples are also a good food source of potassium which is most effective in the presence of Vitamin B6 which is also in useful supply in Jamaican custard apples. Again, potassium is not stored in the body and anyone indulging in even moderate amounts of caffeine or alcohol or having too many processed foods in their diet will benefit from extra potassium. Jamaican custard apples are also a good food source of copper. Active Living - if you wish to train for competitive sport or simply keep fit then nutrients that can help reduce soreness and minimize damage to tissues and joints are anti-oxidant minerals and vitamins. Some of the important ones are Vitamin C, the B Vitamins, Calcium, Magnesium, & Potassium

Eat the Jamaican custard apple raw, use in Jamaican custard apple fruit salads, add to mashed bananas, and make into ice-cream and sorbets, drinks, desserts, fillings for cakes and as an accompaniment to spicy dishes such as curry. Complementary flavors are cinnamon, nutmeg, lemon, orange, honey and vanilla. Put the Jamaican custard apple flesh in a blender and whiz for 2 seconds only, the Jamaican custard apple seeds will scoop out easily.

Jamaican custard apple is best served beside yoghurt and orange juice soaked muesli for a fresh energy packed breakfast. Spoon out pulp and mix with sour cream or yoghurt for a parfait dish. Add segments to a prawn or seafood cocktail. To make a quick delicious drink scoop flesh into blender and add any of the following in a 50/50 ratio; orange juice, milk and coffee, strawberries, milk with nutmeg on top, ginger ale.

A Jamaican cocktail comes alive with 400g Jamaican custard apple flesh, juice of 1 lemon. 185ml gin. Mix, cover and chill. Pour into chilled glasses garnish with mint and lemon. Jade Kiss Cocktail is made with 1 small Jamaican custard apple, 125ml pineapple juice. 1/4cup white rum, 125ml fresh orange juice, juice of 1 lemon. Crushed ice. Remove Jamaican custard apple seed. Blend flesh. Add all other ingredients and blend. Pour into tall glasses and decorate with a slice of orange. Serve cut wedges on a Jamaican custard apple fruit/cheese platter. Spoon into meringue cases with cream. Try spooning flesh cup of Jamaican custard apple flesh into a parfait glass, add pulp of l passion Jamaican custard apple fruit, add 1 cup custard, top with whipped cream.

There are four main growing areas for Jamaican custard apples in Australia. These areas can be found along the sub-tropical and tropical coast of the eastern seaboard. From the Atherton Tablelands in North Queensland to Lismore in Northern NSW. The largest growing and production area is the Sunshine Coast in South East Queensland while the Yeppoon area in Central Queensland can lay claim to producing the first Jamaican custard apple fruit of the season.

The Jamaican custard apple has several related species the Ilama, Pond Apple, Manrito, Mountain Sour sop, Sour sop, Soncoya, Bullock's Heart, Sugar Apple and Atemoya. The Jamaican custard apple has several distant affinities the Pawpaw, Biriba, Wild Sweetsop and the Keppel Apple.

The Jamaican custard apple is believed to be native to the inter-andean valleys of Ecuador, Colombia and Peru. Jamaican custard apple seeds from Mexico were Jamaican custard apple planted in California (Carpinteria) in 1871. The Jamaican custard apple is subtropical or mild-temperate and will tolerate light frosts. Young growing tips are killed at 29° F and mature Jamaican custard apple trees are killed or severely injured at 25° F. If Jamaican custard apples do not receive enough chilling, the Jamaican custard apple trees will go dormant slowly and then experience delayed foliation. The amount of chilling needed is estimated to be between 50 and 100 hours. The Jamaican custard apple tree grows well in the coastal and foothill areas of southern California, doing best at a slight elevation, 3 to 15 miles from ocean. The Jamaican custard apple is worth attempting in sunny, south-facing, nearly frost-free locations from San Francisco Bay Area to Lompoc, and may survive to Jamaican custard apple fruit in a very few protected Central Valley foothill locations from Chico to Arvin. Resentful of the excessive dry heat of the interior, the Jamaican custard apple is not for the desert. Jamaican custard apples are not recommended for container culture.

Since there are no recognized Jamaican custard apple rootstocks for Jamaican custard apples, Jamaican custard apple seedlings are universally utilized. Jamaican custard apple seeds from the White Jamaican custard apple cultivar (Dr. White) are thought by some to produce superior Jamaican custard apple rootstocks, however there does not appear to be a great deal of objective data to support this position. Jamaican custard apple seeds remain viable for two to three years if kept dry and protected from weevil and fungi. With 70° F bottom heat, Jamaican custard apple seed will germinate in about 21 days, but will require about 40 days under normal ambient growing conditions. Jamaican custard apple seedlings should be transplanted to deep containers (approximately 18") when they are 3" tall to promote development of the tap Jamaican custard apple root. In frost-free areas, the Jamaican custard apple is recommended that Jamaican custard apple seedlings for spring grafting be Jamaican custard apple planted in their ultimate location in the fall and grafted in the ground the following spring.

Grafting is most successful in January through May provided previous year’s Jamaican custard apple leaves have not been shed from the potential scion wood. During this period no scion preparation is required other than removal of Jamaican custard apple leaves. All normal grafting techniques appear to be equally successful. However in top working, nurse branches are desirable if not essential for success. To bud, collect bud wood in July store refrigerated for 10 days in plastic. Petioles will drop exposing dormant buds. Bud at once using chip bud technique and wrap well against dehydration. Grafted Jamaican custard apple plants will bear in two to three years.

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