Jamaican Cerassee Medicinal And Jamaican food recipes uses.
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Jamaican Cerassee In Jamaican Food Recipes

Jamaican Cerassee Preparation Techniques

Jamaican cerassee is native to Africa, the Middle East and the Mediterranean area. Jamaican cerassee was introduced to Brazil by African slaves and from there Jamaican cerassee spread to the rest of Latin America and the West Indies. Today Jamaican cerassee is a staple in Jamaica, where Jamaican cerassee grows wild. Jamaican cerassee also grows wild in Asia where Jamaican cerassee is used medicinally, and as a vegetable. A Jamaican cerassee tea made of the vine is used for diabetes, hypertension, worms, dysentery, and malaria and as a general tonic and blood purifier. Jamaican cerassee is also very effective to relieve constipation and colds and fevers in children.

The Jamaican cerassee fruit does not have any Jamaican cerassee seeds. A climbing annual Jamaican cerassee plant cultivated in gardens for the sake of its ornamental Jamaican cerassee fruit, which is of a rich orange red color, ovate attenuated towards each extremity, angular, warty, not unlike a cucumber. The name is derived from Mordio, to bite, so called from the bitten appearance. The Jamaican cerassee plant has not been examined qualitatively. A liniment is made by adding the pulped Jamaican cerassee fruit (without the Jamaican cerassee seeds) to almond oil. This is useful for piles, burns, chapped hands, etc. The pulp is also used as a poultice. The fluid extract is used for dropsy. Caution is required in administering large doses resulting in death. A dose of 6 to 15 grains is apt for any one dose.

Jamaican cerassee, a wild variety of Momordica charantia is traditionally prepared as a Jamaican cerassee tea for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the West Indies and Central America. To investigate a possible hypoglycemic effect, concentrated aqueous extracts of Jamaican cerassee were administered to normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice. In normal mice, intraperitoneal administration of Jamaican cerassee improved glucose tolerance after 8 hr, and in streptozotocin diabetic mice the level of hyperglycemia was reduced by 50% after 5 hr. Cchronicoral administration of Jamaican cerassee to normal mice for 13 days improved glucose tolerance. The Jamaican cerassee extracts did not significantly alter plasma insulin concentrations, suggesting that Jamaican cerassee may exert an extra pancreatic effect to promote glucose disposal.

Jamaican cerassee contains a bitter principle, momordocin. The young Jamaican cerassee leaf contains 3.6 gm. /100 gm of vitamin C and yields two resin acids and momordocin. An extract of the Jamaican cerassee leaf has given positive antibiotic tests with three out of five pathogens with which Jamaican cerassee have been tested. Although Jamaican cerassee is used as an anti-diabetic, careful tests do not support this use. Jamaican cerassee has some hypoglycemic action when tested in rabbits. An infusion of the Jamaican cerassee plant has shown mild, but not consistent, anti-malarial effects. Hence the use of the Jamaican cerassee plant by the Jamaicans for "paludismo" and sometimes referred to as "yellow fever Jamaican cerassee tree sickness". The Jamaican cerassee plant contains a highly aromatic volatile oil, a fixed oil, carotene, a resin, two alkaloids one of which is momordocin and a saponin. Momordocin is an amaroid and is obtained as a crystalline powder. Jamaican cerassee also contains 0.038 % of an unnamed alkaloid. The total carotenoid pigment is estimated at 8.53 gm. and the vitamin A potency is 2.4 to 5.6 IU/gm.

A clear reddish-brown oil from the Jamaican cerassee seed assays 46.7 % a-eleos. Jamaican cerassee tearic acid, 7.7 % of linoleic acid, 15.8 % of oleic acid and 29.8 % of Jamaican cerassee tearic acid. The dried Jamaican cerassee root yields 12.84 % of ash and the dried Jamaican cerassee fruit 11.7 % and both ashes contain iron, phosphorus and calcium. In Northern Zimbabwe the feeding of 1lb of the Jamaican cerassee leaf and Jamaican cerassee flower to a sheep over three weeks has produced no ill effects. Where Jamaican cerassee is consumed regularly, there are no occurrences of osteoporosis. Jamaican cerassee is the traditional and conventional consensus that this can be attributed to Jamaican cerassee. In defense of this analysis, African herbalist practitioners, point as evidence the fact that Jamaican cerassee. Consumers show an increased strength in their nails and hair. Generally the bone structure of these consumers is strong and healthy.

In particular, Jamaican conventional doctors used to comment on the bone strength of the locals. A famous episode with one such conventional doctor occurred when the doctor broke a broom over the head of a local during an argument. The impact was so hard that the broken broom flew to the roof, hit the roof and come back hitting the doctor over his head and cracking Jamaican cerassee. The local sustained a bump while the doctor had to have stitches.

Jamaican cerassee is rich in vitamin A, vitamin C, Calcium and Iron and in their natural form; these vitamins and minerals are easily absorbed by the system, strengthening the bones thereby avoiding osteoporosis. Following a proper diet with the right amounts of minerals, vitamins and regular intake of Jamaican cerassee will reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Jamaican cerasee's high concentration of Calcium and other bone-friendly minerals and vitamins help the body increase bone density.

Jamaican cerassee is a wise decision to start taking Jamaican cerassee. From as early as ten years old, during the fast growing period of a child. Later in life, regular exercise and regular intake of Jamaican cerassee will help build bone mass. Women are especially at risk of contacting osteoporosis, in particular after menopause, when estrogen levels drop and are therefore advised to take Jamaican cerassee regularly.

When bruised the Jamaican cerassee plant emits a strongly unpleasant smell. The Zulu use Jamaican cerassee as a liniment, made by infusing the Jamaican cerassee fruit (minus the Jamaican cerassee seed) in olive or almond oil, as an application to chapped hands, burns and hemorrhoids. The mashed Jamaican cerassee fruit is used as a poultice. Extracts have been administered for the relief of dropsy. Outside South Africa, Jamaican cerassee as a liniment, made by infusing the Jamaican cerassee fruit (minus the Jamaican cerassee seed) in olive or almond oil, as an application to chapped hands, burns and hemorrhoids
and the mashed Jamaican cerassee fruit is used as a poultice. Extracts have been administered for the relief of dropsy.

The Shangaan use the Jamaican cerassee leaves in Jamaican cerassee tea form as a blood purifier and for liver deficiencies. In nutritional
deprived areas and in winter (dry season), postnatal mothers eat the Jamaican cerassee leaves to stimulate milk production. In the southern parts of Mozambique the Jamaican cerassee leaves are taken as an anti-inflammatory remedy and particular sought for urinary tract inflammations. The Jamaican cerassee fruit is especially appreciated for its bitter taste by the Shangaan and the Kanuri of North-East Nigeria.

Jamaicans are particularly fond of the Jamaican cerassee leaves and use them as an herbal medicine and culinary herb. The Jamaican cerassee leaves in Jamaican cerassee tea form are used for diabetes, digestive disorders, fevers, ulcers and a mild form of malaria "paludismo". Jamaican cerassee is especially sought after as a detoxifier. A culinary specialty recommends the Jamaican cerassee leaves, ground peanuts and honey is mixed together and used as a sauce in chicken and meat dishes.

Jamaican cerassee is much used in West Africa as a medicine in both man and horse, particular as a bitter stomachic, as a wash for fever and yaws, and as a purgative. The Jamaican cerassee fruit pulp or the pounded Jamaican cerassee fruit mixed with oil is used as an antiphlogistic dressing. The Jamaican cerassee root is sometimes an ingredient in an aphrodisiac preparation and in the treatment of urethral discharges. The Jamaican cerassee fruit is used for making a poultice and the Jamaican cerassee plant a bitter tonic. The tender Jamaican cerassee fruit and shoot are sometimes boiled with meat and both Jamaican cerassee leaf and Jamaican cerassee fruit are added to soup probably as a vehicle for medicinal uses.

Among the Ngizim of Bornu the Jamaican cerassee leaf is placed in the water used for ceremonial purposes. The young Jamaican cerassee leaf and tendril are used by the Pedi as a potherb and as an anti-emetic. Dragendorff says the ripe Jamaican cerassee fruit is used for colic, as an emetic and drastic purgative. He also reports the use of the Jamaican cerassee seed with oil in the treatment of hemorrhoids, frostbite and burns, and the Jamaican cerassee root for jaundice and diseases of the liver.

Jamaican cerassee is used In the Congo for colic. In the Indian Peninsula, the whole Jamaican cerassee plant mixed with other herbs is used for psoriasis, scabies and other coetaneous diseases. In Japan, Jamaican cerassee enters in the composition of a remedy for Jamaican cerassee skin ailments. In China the Jamaican cerassee is considered a traditional medicine and is widely used by Chinese traditional doctors worldwide.

Jamaican cerassee medicinal properties change according to the environment in which Jamaican cerassee is found. Climate and soil play an important role in the concentration of its active ingredients and medicinal properties. Jamaican cerassee is believed that Southern Africa has three different subspecies of Momordica, each exhibiting particular properties. Digestive Tonic is made with Jamaican cerassee. A true wonder of the African Herbal kingdom, Jamaican cerassee is well known within all its communities. An ancient and potent herbal remedy, Jamaican cerassee is sold by African herbalists, traditional herbal establishments and often recommended by conventional doctors

Jamaican cerassee is traditionally used as a digestive, liver and pancreas tonic. Jamaican cerassee is effective at detoxifying the body and counteracting the effects of overindulgence in fatty and spicy foods and alcohol. The Momordica species is used in homeopathic medicine, African, Indian and Chinese traditional medicines and is a registered medicine in Eastern countries. Jamaican cerassee is considered as one of the most popular African herbs and often available in the street markets of African cities. Jamaican cerassee is consumed in countries such as Portugal, India, Japan, the Philippines, Puerto Rica, China. Jamaican cerassee is safe to use with no known side effects, and is suitable and recommended for children. As a detoxifier, digestive and liver tonic, Jamaican cerassee rates as a clear favorite and is regarded as one of the most effective herbal treatments for said indications. Due to Jamaican cerassee's nourishing effect on the liver, Jamaican cerassee has an invigorating effect on the whole body. For further information and properties of this herb, please read our Jamaican cerassee page.

Jamaican cerassee is rich in vitamins A & C, carotene, calcium, iron, phosphorous and alkaloids and increases energy and stamina. Jamaican cerassee cleanses the body of harmful toxins thereby increasing energy, vitality and stamina. Jamaican cerassee is nutritious. Because Jamaican cerassee is natural, the vitamins and minerals contained in the Jamaican cerassee are easily absorbed by the digestive system thereby allowing for greater absorption and efficacy. Jamaican cerassee is highly recommended for osteoporosis sufferers. Where Jamaican cerassee is regularly consumed there has been is no occurrence of osteoporosis Jamaican cerassee should be used moderately. Jamaican cerassee is recommended for suffers of ulcers (stomach and duodenum), bile and digestive disorders. Momordica passed three out of five pathogen tests and is considered as a natural antibiotic

Besides the African following of this herb, Jamaican cerassee effectiveness is admired and respected by homeopaths and conventional doctors, who have personally experienced its effects on their patients. Jamaican cerassee's richness in natural vitamins and minerals greatly contribute to its efficacy and quality. Jamaican cerassee's benefits are such that UNICEF field workers are known to advise parents to supplement their children's diets with Jamaican cerassee. In areas where Jamaican cerassee is consumed regularly, there is no occurrence of osteoporosis. Jamaican cerassee consumers also show an increase in the strength of their nails and hair. Jamaican cerassee is rich in vitamin A, vitamin C, iron and calcium and in their natural form they are easily absorbed by the system.

There are no signs of toxicity with this remedy. The Jamaican cerassee fruit of the Jamaican cerassee is considered to be a purgative. Each capsule contains 300 mg Jamaican cerassee, 50 mg enzymes, and 10 mg Magnesium Jamaican cerassee tea rate. Digestive Tonic is free from artificial preservatives, chemicals, colorants, sugar and alcohol. 3 to 4 capsules daily, hour before meals with a full glass of water. There are no recorded side effects from the use of Jamaican cerassee. For severe cases of conditions, six capsules of Digestive Tonic can be taken daily at regular intervals.

Patients with a hypersensitivity to any of the Jamaican cerassee plant species or ingredients. Not to be taken during pregnancy. Jamaican cerassee is traditionally used in the support of liver detoxification, digestive tract disorders, gall bladders disorders, ulcers, bile and urinary tract inflammation. Jamaican cerassee is also recommended for diabetic patients. Due to Jamaican cerassee's nourishing effect on the liver, Jamaican cerassee has an invigorating effect on the whole body.

In areas where Jamaican cerassee is consumed regularly, there is no occurrence of osteoporosis. Jamaican cerassee is rich in vitamin A, vitamin C, iron and calcium and in their natural form these vitamins and minerals are easily absorbed by the system. Jamaican cerassee is the traditional consensus that lack of osteoporosis can be attributed directly to Jamaican cerassee. In defense of this analysis, African herbalist practitioners, point as evidence the fact that Jamaican cerassee consumers show an increased strength in their nails and hair and generally the bone structure of these consumers is strong and healthy.

Following a proper diet with the right amounts of minerals, vitamins and regular intake of Jamaican cerassee will reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Jamaican cerassee's high concentration of Calcium and other bone-friendly minerals and vitamins increases bone density and mass. Jamaican cerassee is a wise decision to start taking Jamaican cerassee from as early as ten years old, during the fast growing period of a child. Women are especially at risk of contacting osteoporosis, in particular after menopause, when estrogen levels drop and are therefore advised to take Jamaican cerassee regularly.

When the Portuguese settled in Africa, a troop garrison was placed on the borders of the Limpopo River. The troops soon succumbed to an epidemic of marsh fever (paludism), a mosquito transmitted disease. Conventional treatment at the time was painful and slow. A local Shangaan pointed out a healer (traditional doctor) who had an effective cure for marsh fever. Soon word spread that this disease could be cured in three days with this bitter herb - Kakana. Within a short period of time, the Portuguese troops were queuing at the door of the traditional doctor and refused treatment by the conventional doctor residing in the camp. The humiliation was total. This is one of many painful lessons conventional medicine has learned in Africa.

The traditional doctor capitalized on the economic potential of his medication. He set up a small restaurant next to the camp and refused to sell his medication to the troops unless they ate at his restaurant. Kakana was not only prescribed medicinally but was served as a sauce with everything from prawns to chickens. This climber with bright green Jamaican cerassee leaves bears striking orange to red spindle shaped ripe Jamaican cerassee fruit.

Glabrous to slightly hairy perennial herb with a tuberous Jamaican cerassee rootstock, whole Jamaican cerassee plant bad-smelling (rather like the common thorn apple or Datura stramonium), and more so when bruised. Stems mostly annual prostrate or climbing, to 5 m long, cut twigs exude clear sap. Tendrils simple. Jamaican cerassee leaves waxy, lower surface paler than upper, deeply palmately 5-7-lobed, to 12 cm long, margin toothed, stalked.

Jamaican cerassee flowers solitary, male and female Jamaican cerassee flowers on the same Jamaican cerassee plant (monoecious). Male Jamaican cerassee flowers prominently Jamaican cerassee teate (subtended by a Jamaican cerassee leaflet), bract ovate, to 18 mm long, pallid, green-veined, calyx green to purplish-black, corolla white to yellow, apricot or orange, green-veined, with grey, brownish or black spots near the bases of the three inner petals, 10-20 mm long, anthers orange. Female Jamaican cerassee flowers inconspicuously Jamaican cerassee tea, corolla rather smaller than males.

Jamaican cerassee fruit spindle shaped, dark green with 9 or 10 regular or irregular rows of cream or yellowish short blunt spines, ripening to bright orange or red, 25-60 mm long, opening automatically more or less irregularly into three valves that curl back (also opens when the tip is touched). Jamaican cerassee seeds ovate in outline, rather compressed, up to 11 mm long, light brown, surface sculptured; encased in a sticky scarlet red fleshy covering that is edible and sweet, tasting like watermelon. The balsam pear Jamaican cerassee flowers and Jamaican cerassee fruits throughout the year, but mainly from October to May.

M. balsamina is fairly common and widespread in Namibia, Botswana, Swaziland and all the provinces of South Africa except the Western Cape. Jamaican cerassee is also indigenous to tropical Africa and Asia, Arabia, India and Australia. Jamaican cerassee has been cultivated in gardens in Europe since the 1800's.

The balsam pear grows in white, yellow, red and grey sandy soil, also loam, and clay, alluvial, gravelly and calcareous soil. Jamaican cerassee thrives in full sun and semi-shade in grassland, savanna, woodland, forest margins, coastal dune forests and in river bank vegetation as well as disturbed areas. In southern Africa Jamaican cerassee grows from about sea level to 1465 m altitude, in dry to wet areas with a rainfall of 200-1200 mm annually. Jamaican cerassee seems to be frost hardy.

The genus name Momordica could perhaps refer to the sculptured Jamaican cerassee seeds or the uneven appearance of the Jamaican cerassee fruits, which look as if they had been bitten; the Latin mordeo means to bite. However, Jackson (1990) doubts this explanation. The specific epithet balsamina means 'like balsam/balm', from the Latin balsamum , and refers to one of the medicinal uses of this Jamaican cerassee plant.

Momordica is an Old World genus of about 40 species, the majority of them in tropical Africa. They are recognized by the Jamaican cerassee seeds that are always enveloped in bright red pulp and by the often prominent bracts subtending the male Jamaican cerassee flowers. The Jamaican cerassee fruit is eaten by birds, ants, probably by some mammals (though not recorded) and also by humans. The Jamaican cerassee leaves and green Jamaican cerassee fruit are cooked and eaten as spinach, sometimes with groundnuts, or simply mixed with porridge. The young Jamaican cerassee leaves contain vitamin C. The raw ripe Jamaican cerassee fruits are also eaten.

According to Watt and Breyer-Brandwijk (1962), the Jamaican cerassee plant contains a bitter principle momordicin. They report that 'overseas a liniment, made by infusing the Jamaican cerassee fruit (minus the Jamaican cerassee seed) in olive or almond oil, is used as an application to chapped hands, burns and hemorrhoids and the mashed Jamaican cerassee fruit is used as a poultice'. This practice probably explains the species name balsamina. Watt and Breyer-Brandwijk also list many medicinal and other uses of M. balsamina in tropical Africa and elsewhere.

Jamaican cerassee is also used in a poultice for burns and is reputed to be used to treat diabetes. The Vhavenda take Jamaican cerassee leaf infusions as anti-emetics. There are conflicting reports on the toxicity of the Jamaican cerassee fruit, both green and ripe. The green Jamaican cerassee fruit contains a resin, toxic alkaloids and a saponic glycoside that cause vomiting and diarrhea; these substances are denatured in the cooking process. The Jamaican cerassee fruit is suspected of poisoning dogs and pigs.

Roodt (1998) states that the medicinal action of the Jamaican cerassee fruit results from the saponic glycosides present. She reports uses in the Okavango delta and elsewhere for abortion, boils, burns, chapped hands and feet, external sores, frostbite, hemorrhoids
, headache, and as a purgative.

The Jamaican cerassee leaf sap is said to be an effective metal cleaner. In the past, the green Jamaican cerassee fruit had been used as an ingredient of arrow poison. In the Okavango delta, the Jamaican cerassee fruit can be used in cursing one's enemy; his/her stomach will burst in the same way that the ripe Jamaican cerassee fruit bursts open spontaneously.

This species is not discussed in any of the standard horticultural books on indigenous South African Jamaican cerassee plants. However, its natural habitat and ecology can be used as guidelines. The balsam pear can be grown from Jamaican cerassee seed in most areas, as long as the young Jamaican cerassee plants are protected against drought, severe frost and too much sunlight. As a climber, the stems will need some support to give a showy effect

The Balsam Apple is an annual climbing Jamaican cerassee plant, grown in our gardens for its Jamaican cerassee fruit, which is employed in domestic practice as a vulnerary, and an application to old sores, chapped hands, piles, etc. Jamaican cerassee is commonly prepared for use with alcohol or whisky. Jamaican cerassee evidently possesses medicinal properties, and I have seen good effects from its local use.

Jamaican cerassee is claimed to be poisonous when taken internally, yet I have known Jamaican cerassee taken with safety in doses of ten to thirty drops. Cures of dropsy are reported from its use. The limited use I have known made of Jamaican cerassee internally, was to relieve muscular pains, lame back, and stiffness of joints; in some cases Jamaican cerassee seemed to do good. As the agent is very common, and easily cultivated, Jamaican cerassee would be well to prepare a tincture from the fresh Jamaican cerassee fruit to Alcohol 76 Oj., and test Jamaican cerassee thoroughly, both as a local remedy, and used internally. Of such a preparation the dose would be quite small, say commencing with one drop

Women in Latin American and the West Indies use the Jamaican cerassee leaf for menstrual problems to promote discharge after childbirth. The Jamaican cerassee tea is taken for 9 days after giving birth to clean out and tone up all the organs involved in the delivery. Jamaican cerassee is also used as a natural method of birth control, by taking two cups each day after intercourse, for three days. Jamaican cerassee is said that women who drink Jamaican cerassee daily will not conceive during that time.

As a wash, the Jamaican cerassee tea is used externally for sores, rashes, Jamaican cerassee skin ulcers and all Jamaican cerassee skin problems. A Jamaican cerassee bath is good for arthritis, rheumatism, gout and other similar ailments.

In Brazil, a Jamaican cerassee tea is used as a tonic and remedy for colds, fever and pains due to arthritis and rheumatism. In Curacao and Aruba, the Jamaican cerassee tea is used to lower blood pressure. In the Philippines, Jamaican cerassee is cultivated as a vegetable and cooked like other Jamaican cerassee leafy vegetables. In Cuba, Jamaican cerassee Jamaican cerassee tea is used as a remedy for colitis, liver complaints, fever and as a Jamaican cerassee skin lotion
. A Jamaican cerassee tea of the Jamaican cerassee root is used to expel kidney stones. In India, the green, unripe Jamaican cerassee fruits are soaked in water and cooked in curry and other dishes. The juice of the ripe Jamaican cerassee fruit, which contains valuable enzymes and minerals, is taken for diabetes.

Researchers at the University of Miami School of Medicine have found an element, known as GUANYLATE CYCLASE in the ripe Jamaican cerassee fruit that has the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer caused by chemicals. Jamaican cerassee is also being studied at the Sloan-Kettering Institute as a possible cure for leukemia
.

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